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Can You Solve The Poisonous Flowers Problem? Sunday Puzzle

Martin is a gardener in Mathland. There are 100 poisonous flowers in his garden that he wants to destroy. On their own, the flowers do not change in number.

Martin has a spray to kill the poisonous flowers, but the spray works in a specific way. The spray has settings to destroy exactly 3, 5, 14, or 17 flowers instantly. The spray only works if there are at least as many flowers as the setting (if there are 15 flowers, for example, attempting to destroy 17 flowers does nothing).

Furthermore, if at least one flower survives after he sprays them, the flowers grow back instantly depending on how many died. After 3 flowers die, 12 grow back; after 5 die, 17 grow back; after 14 die, 8 grow back; and after 17 die, 2 grow back.

If the number of flowers is ever zero, then the flowers never grow back. Can Martin ever kill all the poisonous flowers in his garden? Assume he has an unlimited amount of spray.

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Poisonous Flowers Puzzle?

Or keep reading.

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Answer To The Poisonous Flower Puzzle

Martin will not be able to kill all of the poisonous flowers.

We can understand why by thinking from the end. In order that Martin can kill all the flowers, the number of flowers has to be 3, 5, 14, or 17 before applying the spray. As there are 100 flowers to start, this would require the number of flowers to decrease by 97, 95, 86, or 83 from the initial amount.

Is this possible? Consider the net change for each amount of spraying flower killer:

–If Martin sprays to kill 3 flowers, then 12 flowers grow back. This is a net of +9 flowers.

–If Martin sprays to kill 5 flowers, then 17 flowers grow back. This is a net of +12 flowers.

–If Martin sprays to kill 14 flowers, then 8 flowers grow back. This is a net of -6 flowers.

–If Martin sprays to kill 17 flowers, then 2 flowers grow back. This is a net of -15 flowers.

In each of these cases (+9, +12, -6, -15), the number of flowers is changed by a multiple of 3.

This means from the initial 100 flowers, the number of flowers is then increased or decreased by a multiple of 3. Therefore, the number of flowers can never be decreased by 97 (which is 1 more than a multiple of 3), 95 (which is 2 more than a multiple of 3), 86 (which is 2 more than a multiple of 3), or 83 (which is 2 more than a multiple of 3).

Here is an alternate explanation. The initial number of flowers is 100 ≡ 1 (mod 3). After each spray, Martin changes the number of flowers by a multiple of 3, so the number of flowers left is always equal to 1 (mod 3). In order to kill all the flowers, Martin needs to have 3, 5, 14, or 17 flowers left. But 3 ≡ 0 (mod 3) and 5 ≡ 4 ≡ 17 ≡ 2 (mod 3), so it’s never possible to attain these numbers of flowers as Martin always has a number of flowers equal to 1 (mod 3).

Martin will never be rid of the poisonous flowers.

Sources
I read the dragon problem in this document http://webdocs.cs.ualberta.ca/~hayward/272/variants.pdf

It references this book: A. Engel, “Problem-Solving Strategies”, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1998. Problem 51.

Originally posted here:
Can You Solve The Poisonous Flowers Problem? Sunday Puzzle

CCAAA announces menu and schedules for centers for active living for week of Feb. 20 – Clearfield Progress

Clearfield County Area Agency on Aging has announced the menu and program schedule for its centers for active living for the week of Feb. 20.

All centers are closed Monday, Feb. 20 in observance of Presidents Day.

Senior Menu

All meals are served with 8 ounces of milk.

Tuesday, Feb. 21, Baked turkey pot pie with potatoes and vegetables, coleslaw, buttermilk biscuit, mixed fruit salad

Wednesday, Feb. 22, Stuffed steak braciole with gravy, whipped potatoes, sliced carrots, dinner roll, gelatin

Thursday, Feb. 23, egg omelet with cheese, breakfast sausage, breakfast potatoes, white bread with jelly, navel orange

Friday, Feb. 24, breaded fish sandwich, cheesy bacon and chive potatoes, green beans, sandwich roll, pineapple and oranges

Clearfield Center for Active Living, 116 S. Second St., Clearfield, 765-9319, activities include Nintendo, Wii, Internet Caf, lending library, puzzles, Healthy Steps in Motion exercise and cable television. Swimming is held each Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. at the Aquatics Club at Clearfield YMCA.

Bowling is held every Wednesday from noon to 4 p.m. at the Clearfield Bowling Lanes. Cards and games are played every afternoon.

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m., Intergenerational programming with YMCA children and 11 a.m., blood pressure checks with Cecilia Kelly, Clear Care Nursing Services. Card games will follow lunch.

Wednesday, 10:30 a.m., Generations Online: Internet Access and Literacy to Elders with Deron Knox, CCAAA Inc. Bring your own laptop or use one of the centers computer. Birthday party day. Card games to follow lunch.

Thursday, 10 a.m., Wii bowling and brain games. Card games to follow lunch.

Friday, 11 a.m., bingo. Card games to follow lunch.

Coalport Center for Active Living, 850 Rear Main St., Coalport, 672-3574, activities include Healthy Steps in Motion exercise, brain aerobics, puzzles, Internet service, bingo, quilting, crafts, lending library, cancer support group and cable television.

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m., Healthy Steps in Motion exercise and 12:30 p.m., Heart Disease Prevention with Dan Dotts, Ridgeview Health and Rehabilitation

Wednesday, 12:15 p.m., birthday celebration, and 12:30 p.m., Health and Wellness: Better Nutrition with Jackie Anderson, CCAAA Inc.

Thursday, 10:30 a.m., Healthy Steps in Motion exercise and 12:20 p.m., bingo

Friday, 12:30 p.m., Name that president

Houtzdale Family Service Center, 40 Terrace Dr., Houtzdale, 378-5120, programs begin at 11 a.m. Activities include cards, games and television.

Tuesday, Medical Services America with Eric Burtnett, blood pressure checks with Richard Himes and PM bingo

Wednesday, Blood pressure checks with Jamie, Clearfield Community Nurses and PM bingo

Thursday, Exercise with Whitney and PM bingo

Karthaus Center for Active Living, 3637 Main St., Karthaus, 263-7277, activities include brain aerobics, crafts, Healthy Steps in Motion exercise, quilting, bingo, walking club, ceramics and intergenerational activities.

Wednesday, 11 a.m., Presidents Day trivia

Friday, 11 a.m., Crafts, cards and games

Kylertown Center for Active Living, 70 Senior Dr., Kylertown, 345-6338, activities include brain aerobics, Healthy Steps in Motion exercise, puzzles, Internet service, crafts, lending library and cable television.

Tuesday, 11 a.m., Healthy Steps in Motion

Wednesday, 11 a.m., Exercise with Penny and birthday celebration

Thursday, 10:45 a.m., cards, games, puzzles and crafts and 11 a.m. Beat the Winter Blues with bingo

Friday, 10:35 a.m., cards, games, puzzles and crafts and 11 a.m., Wii games

Mahaffey Center for Active Living, 58 Market St., Mahaffey, 277-4544, activities include Healthy Steps in Motion exercise, walking club, musical programs, brain aerobics, bingo, quilting and crafts.

Tuesday, 11 a.m., Vets Benefits with Betina Nickolas, Veterans Administration

Wednesday, 11 a.m., Glaucoma with Robin Orris, Blair/Clearfield County Blind Association

Thursday, 10:30 a.m., Healthy Steps in Motion exercise and walking class, Wii games and 11:15 a.m., blood pressure checks

Go here to read the rest:
CCAAA announces menu and schedules for centers for active living for week of Feb. 20 – Clearfield Progress

Game Day: Causality – MacStories

There is a certain amount of trust me, just play this game involved with recommending Causality by UK-based Loju because its such a brain-meltingly complex puzzle game that its hard to explain in writing. In many respects, this game has to be experienced to understand it.

Causality blends time manipulation with a familiar grid-based puzzle game in a way that transcends other games in the puzzle genre. The result is a fresh, compelling game that stands out from the pack.

The goal of Causality is simply to move an astronaut from a starting tile to an exit tile on a grid-based game board, avoiding obstacles in between. The astronauts movement is controlled by swiping up and down. Arrow tiles can be tapped to change the direction they send your astronaut when they pass over the arrow tiles.

Multiple astronauts are added to the equation early in the game adding complexity. Each astronaut has to make it to the exit tile that matches the color of their helmet. When their paths cross, they bounce off of each other heading in the opposite direction. So far, I might have described one of dozens, if not hundreds, of puzzle games on the App Store, but Causality has a trick up its sleeve that makes it different: time.

Time factors into every decision in Causality. Every exit must be reached within a time limit, so even if there is more than one possible path to get there, often only one will work before time runs out. Precise timing is also necessary when activating switches to bypass obstacles, avoiding monsters hiding beneath some tiles, and planning the interaction of multiple astronauts and your past self.

Thats right; your past self plays a role in Causality, which is where things get interesting. Just as you start to get comfortable with the games race against time, Causality adds time portals. When you pass through a portal, you appear at a different point in the timeline with your current self. Suddenly, there are two versions of you interacting and working to get to the exit. This is where it becomes almost impossible to describe what is happening in Causality. It takes a while to get a feel for how the games time loops operate, which is a big part of why this game is so fun.

Trial and error is key to Causality. If you fail, swipe in the opposite direction to rewind time and start over. In all, there are 40 levels split across 4 worlds, plus 5 extra-hard bonus levels per world for a total of 60 puzzles. Thats a big game for one that ramps up in its difficulty fast. As a result, you can expect to get hours of enjoyment from Causality. In a nod to how tough this game is, the developers recently added the ability to skip ahead one level if you get hopelessly stuck, which should help keep the game more fun than frustrating.

The time travel component of Causality makes the game fun by complicating the logistics of guiding your astronauts to their goals. What makes the game stand out, though, is understanding how the time loops work, which is critical in the later levels. Add to that great graphics and a spacey, astronaut-worthy soundtrack and Causality is a real winner that is a must-play game for anyone who loves challenging puzzle games.

Causality is available for iOS on the App Store and for macOS on Steam.

Excerpt from:
Game Day: Causality – MacStories

Legion Recap: Brain Games – Yahoo TV (blog)

After an absolutely bonkersseries premiere that were still trying to make sense of, Legion slows down in Episode 2 and goes inward, deep into the twisted psyche of gifted mutant David Haller.

We pick up with David and Syd escaping into the woods and ominous military men (and that creepy henchman guy, The Eye) in hot pursuit. They arrive safely at Summerland, a gorgeous architectural marvel of a mutant retreat run by Dr. Melanie Bird. She shows David how to filter out all the noise in his head, like turning down a giant volume dial, and use his telepathic skills to hear her thoughts. Then she tells him to rest up: Tomorrow, memory work begins.

RELATEDLegion Boss Makes Sense of the Trippy Series Premiere Plus: Grade It!

Legion Episode 2 FX Marvel

And she wasnt kidding when she called it work: The next day, along with memory artist Ptonomy, she sits David down at a table with these weird metal rods that they all grab onto so they can enter Davids memories together. (Exploring his past will help him better control his powers, Melanie says.) They zap back to a memory of David as a kid chasinghis sister Amy in a field, whilethey stand at a distance, observing. Pretend were in a museum, Melanie tells David. The Museum of You.

But its not all happy memories. While remembering a bedtime story his astronomer dad used to read to him a macabre book called The Worlds Angriest Boy the room starts to shake, and David freaks out, releasing the rods. In fact, he struggles so much that Ptonomys forced to knock him out. When David comes to, Ptonomy hands him a glass of milk and reassures him: The first time is always the worst. But when Ptonomy asks about that bedtime story, David pretends not to remember it. He knows youre lying, David; he saw it in your memory!

RELATEDLegion Review: An Exhilarating Delight, Even if You Dont Like Comic Books

Legion Episode 2 FX Lenny Aubrey Plaza

While David is knocked out, we see another vision from his past: him as a glassy-eyed addict in a therapists office. He talks about his recent breakup, and offhandedly mentions the vapor. Whats that, you ask? We find out when David leaves therapy and finds Lenny waiting for him, sitting on top of an old stove. She got it from some girl I finger-banged, and tradesit ina back alley for a tiny vial of blue liquid. She and David take that vial back to his place, drop a few drops of the blue liquid into a frog-shaped vaporizer, inhale the fumes and lie back with goofy smiles on their faces. Ladies and gentlemen, the vapor!

Back in the present, David tellsSyd he doesnt understand what all the memory work is for. She encourages him to stick with it but she still doesnt want him touching her, even with gloves on. To her, human contact feels like being covered with ants, she says. David isnt deterred, though: Were having a romance of the mind. And later, he figures out how to read her mind which shes not sure she really wants him doing. She does use her thoughts to tell him hes cute, though.

As Melanie and Ptonomy continue to poke around in Davids psyche, they notice him tensing upwhen he catches a glimpse of that ugly beast, the Devil With the Yellow Eyes. And Ptonomy also notices a glitch, a slight gap in Davids memory in the therapists office. It turns out to be a vision of Davids kitchen-utensil tornado from last week, but when they try to go back there, they end up in Davids childhood bedroom instead. Even a seasoned memory artist like Ptonomy is stumped: Hes too strong, he tells Melanie.

RELATEDLegion: Why FXs New Marvel Drama Is Unlike Any Other Superhero Show

The next step for Melanie and company: sticking David into an MRI tube and examining the contours of his brain. (Technician Cary tells David, You have an extremely large amygdala, and David thanks him for the compliment.) But while in the tube, David has visions of his sister Amy looking for him at the psychiatric hospital, only to be told David was never a patient there. Then he sees Amy being confronted by The Eye, which freaks him out enough to send Carys equipment into overdrive. After some creepy noises and another sighting of the Devil With the Yellow Eyes, David wakes up lying on the floor and the entire MRI tube has been launched outside by his sheer psychic powers.

Read More

Legion FX Episode 2 The Eye Amy

Sensing his sisters in danger, David packs up to leave Summerland, but Syd stops him in the elevator. (She even offers to hold hands if hell stay!) She encourages him to do the work and learn the true magnitude of his powers, and then he can rescue Amy. Besides, they wont kill her, Syd says, because shes bait. And speaking of bait: The episode ends with Amy seated in a scary room when The Eye enters and produces a fish tank full of leeches. He sits down uncomfortably close to her and asks, Shall we begin?

Is David making a mistake by not rescuing his sister? And is this all making more sense to you now? (Or less?) Join us for post-Legion talk in the comments.

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Legion Recap: Brain Games – Yahoo TV (blog)

Revealed: The brain training games that actually help fight dementia … – 9Honey

In the mid-2000s, brain-training was all the rage: on buses and trains across the country you would see people delicately tapping away at a Sudoku puzzle or religiously playing word association games.

Then everything suddenly stopped. Perhaps it was the fact that most brain games turned out to be really boring, but everybody stopped training “the most important muscle in your body”.

(Strictly speaking, while the brain can behave like a muscle, it’s technically an organ.)

But now scientists from Edith Cowan University are determined to bring brain training back into the fold for a very good reason: it may be one of the best tools we have to fight off dementia.

In a sweeping review of the scientific literature, researchers examined the effectiveness of 18 popular brain-training apps, determining that just two had what it takes to truly help your brain.

The winners in what the scientists determined to be “Level 1” programs were the $19.95 a month subscription toCogniFit Brain Fitness and the $96-a-year program, BrainHQ.

More fancied brain programs like My Brain Trainer ($29.95 for a year’s subscription) and Luminosity ($299.95 for a lifetime subscription) were rated farther down the list as Level 2 and 3 programs respectively.

RELATED: Fit body, fit brain: 5 ways exercise makes you smarter

For lead researcher Professor Ralph Martins, these findings prove that slowing down the rate of degenerative cognitive diseases doesn’t have to cost you the earth.

“We found that the current evidence indicates that at least some of the commercially available brain training programs can assist in promoting healthy brain aging,” said Martins in a statement.

“The evidence now supports the notion that the human brain is plastic in later life and can benefit from properly designed brain training programs.”

The reason why these programs help your brain stay in tip top shape harks back to an age-old bit of common sense: if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it.

By regularly testing your neural capabilities, you’re effectively forcing your brain to grow more efficient to deal with the tasks that you put in front of it just like a muscle that grows back stronger after using it in the gym.

By doing this regularly, the researchers theorise that people are able to “keep open” the brain’s pathways that traditionally shut down as a result of dementia.

Other strategies to delay the onset of dementia include regularly engaging in aerobic activity, eating a healthy diet and keeping your social life active as you age.

Read the original here:
Revealed: The brain training games that actually help fight dementia … – 9Honey

Southeast Asia’s Playlab invests $1M in Brazilian gaming startup Cupcake Entertainment – TechCrunch

Thailand-based casual game studio Playlab has turned investor after it invested $1 million intoCupcake Entertainment, a Brazil-basedgame maker.

The deal is a little different in that it is not an equity investment; instead, Playlab and Cupcake have agreed to a profit-share deal. Cupcake started producing games in 2014, and its current titles include Letters of Goldand Words of Gold.Co-founder and CMOGabriel Strmerdescribed itsproducts which are for iOS, Android and Facebook as casual brain games that require users to make boards, or do mathematic combinations.

Strmer said Cupcake has seen consistent growth increasing its revenue 45 percent per month on average over the past 18 months, and tripling it since September 2016 but it has struggled with cash flow when it comes to user acquisition. The eight-person team, he said, has burned through a mountain of credit cards to financeonline advertising and marketing campaigns, the tricky part of which being that revenue generated takes a month before it is paid out. The $1 million investment will be used entirely for user acquisition purposes,Strmer explained, whilePlaylab will also take a consulting role to help Cupcake and its efforts to scale.

Playlab raised a $5 million Series A roundin 2015. Speaking to TechCrunch at the time, CEO and co-founderJakob Lykkegaard Pedersen said the firm was already profitable. It has planted roots beyond its business by making an acquisition and working with other startups, including fellow Bangkok-based game lab Infinity Levels on a co-marketing and development deal.

Strmer and Pedersen first met when Cupcake was part of the Game Founders accelerator program in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in 2015, where Pedersen is one of the mentors. According toStrmer, he was so impressed by the companys initial pitch that he promised to invest $1 million if it could maintain its promise.

Its only taken 18 months, Strmer joked.

We did have many other [financing] options on the table, but these are guys we know and we like them alot, he added. We want to be the number onecasual brain puzzle game company in the worldand believe this deal with Playlab will help us get there faster.

Beyond the deal,Strmer said the companies are exploring how they can work together on future titles and others initiatives.

Originally posted here:
Southeast Asia’s Playlab invests $1M in Brazilian gaming startup Cupcake Entertainment – TechCrunch

Legion Recap: Brain Games – TVLine

After an absolutely bonkersseries premiere that were still trying to make sense of, Legion slows down in Episode 2 and goes inward, deep into the twisted psyche of gifted mutant David Haller.

We pick up with David and Syd escaping into the woods and ominous military men (and that creepy henchman guy, The Eye) in hot pursuit. They arrive safely at Summerland, a gorgeous architectural marvel of a mutant retreat run by Dr. Melanie Bird. She shows David how to filter out all the noise in his head, like turning down a giant volume dial, and use his telepathic skills to hear her thoughts. Then she tells him to rest up: Tomorrow, memory work begins.

RELATEDLegion Boss Makes Sense of the Trippy Series Premiere Plus: Grade It!

And she wasnt kidding when she called it work: The next day, along with memory artist Ptonomy, she sits David down at a table with these weird metal rods that they all grab onto so they can enter Davids memories together. (Exploring his past will help him better control his powers, Melanie says.) They zap back to a memory of David as a kid chasinghis sister Amy in a field, whilethey stand at a distance, observing. Pretend were in a museum, Melanie tells David. The Museum of You.

But its not all happy memories. While remembering a bedtime story his astronomer dad used to read to him a macabre book called The Worlds Angriest Boy the room starts to shake, and David freaks out, releasing the rods. In fact, he struggles so much that Ptonomys forced to knock him out. When David comes to, Ptonomy hands him a glass of milk and reassures him: The first time is always the worst. But when Ptonomy asks about that bedtime story, David pretends not to remember it. He knows youre lying, David; he saw it in your memory!

RELATEDLegion Review: An Exhilarating Delight, Even if You Dont Like Comic Books

While David is knocked out, we see another vision from his past: him as a glassy-eyed addict in a therapists office. He talks about his recent breakup, and offhandedly mentions the vapor. Whats that, you ask? We find out when David leaves therapy and finds Lenny waiting for him, sitting on top of an old stove. She got it from some girl I finger-banged, and tradesit ina back alley for a tiny vial of blue liquid. She and David take that vial back to his place, drop a few drops of the blue liquid into a frog-shaped vaporizer, inhale the fumes and lie back with goofy smiles on their faces. Ladies and gentlemen, the vapor!

Back in the present, David tellsSyd he doesnt understand what all the memory work is for. She encourages him to stick with it but she still doesnt want him touching her, even with gloves on. To her, human contact feels like being covered with ants, she says. David isnt deterred, though: Were having a romance of the mind. And later, he figures out how to read her mind which shes not sure she really wants him doing. She does use her thoughts to tell him hes cute, though.

As Melanie and Ptonomy continue to poke around in Davids psyche, they notice him tensing upwhen he catches a glimpse of that ugly beast, the Devil With the Yellow Eyes. And Ptonomy also notices a glitch, a slight gap in Davids memory in the therapists office. It turns out to be a vision of Davids kitchen-utensil tornado from last week, but when they try to go back there, they end up in Davids childhood bedroom instead. Even a seasoned memory artist like Ptonomy is stumped: Hes too strong, he tells Melanie.

RELATEDLegion: Why FXs New Marvel Drama Is Unlike Any Other Superhero Show

The next step for Melanie and company: sticking David into an MRI tube and examining the contours of his brain. (Technician Cary tells David, You have an extremely large amygdala, and David thanks him for the compliment.) But while in the tube, David has visions of his sister Amy looking for him at the psychiatric hospital, only to be told David was never a patient there. Then he sees Amy being confronted by The Eye, which freaks him out enough to send Carys equipment into overdrive. After some creepy noises and another sighting of the Devil With the Yellow Eyes, David wakes up lying on the floor and the entire MRI tube has been launched outside by his sheer psychic powers.

Sensing his sisters in danger, David packs up to leave Summerland, but Syd stops him in the elevator. (She even offers to hold hands if hell stay!) She encourages him to do the work and learn the true magnitude of his powers, and then he can rescue Amy. Besides, they wont kill her, Syd says, because shes bait. And speaking of bait: The episode ends with Amy seated in a scary room when The Eye enters and produces a fish tank full of leeches. He sits down uncomfortably close to her and asks, Shall we begin?

Is David making a mistake by not rescuing his sister? And is this all making more sense to you now? (Or less?) Join us for post-Legion talk in the comments.

See more here:
Legion Recap: Brain Games – TVLine

Cheyney finishes third in trivia competition – The Philadelphia Tribune

Cheyney Universitys Honda Campus All-Star Challenge (HCASC) varsity team came in third at the regional competition in Washington, D.C., earlier this month, losing the runner-up spot to Howard University by just one bonus question. Chicago State University took top honors.

After nearly six months of preparation, teams from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) from across the nation traveled to seven HBCUs for official national qualifying tournaments. The competitions were fast-paced, action-packed trivia games with questions from various categories including science, history, art, math, general knowledge and current events.

At each site, after a random draw, the teams were placed into divisions of five teams each for a round-robin competition. From there, the top four teams advanced to single-elimination playoffs.

We had trouble with sports questions and, at points, our reaction time was a little slow when it came to hitting the buzzer, acknowledged Clyde Ledbetter, a Cheyney professor who coaches the team. We will work on these areas if we make it to the national competition. Our strengths were in HBCU knowledge, pop culture and literature.

The winner and runner-up from each regional competition automatically go to the April national competition in California where 48 HBCU teams will go head-to-head in the brain games. This year, a new social media voting option allows one school from each of the district championships to make it into nationals based on votes via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr that were tabulated through Feb. 8. In the competition at University of the District of Columbia, Cheyney moved from fifth place to second place in voting.

Meredith Morrison is the teams captain and its only senior. In 2015, she and the Cheyney team came in second in the nation at the California competition, earning $25,000 for the Universitys HCASC program. This year is her last opportunity to go for the gold.

We may not have gotten in the top two at regionals, but our teamwork was amazing, she said. I am insanely proud of how the team did and how well we worked together and complemented each other.

While voting for four of the 48 national spots ended and 14 spots have already been clinched, the rest of the field will be announced on Wednesday.

If we make it to CA, we will expand our knowledge in Black history and global geography, two areas that I noticed we were lacking, Sowersby said. We still need to get quicker on the buzzer and build our confidence. Once you miss one question, its easy to slow down and hesitate. I know we can improve.

Cheyneys varsity players are all Keystone Honors Academy Scholars. In addition to Morrison and Sowersby, a sophomore, freshman Stephen Adasonla and junior Jesse Lucas represent the nations first HBCU. Adasonla is the new kid on the block.

York College, Lincoln University-Missouri, University of Maryland-Eastern Shore, UDC and Bowie State also competed.

See the rest here:
Cheyney finishes third in trivia competition – The Philadelphia Tribune

Brain Games: Focusing on Memory to Reduce Effects of Poverty – School News Network

Kelloggsville Public Schools, MI

Second-grade teacher Patrick Sokol is working to close gaps in achievement seen in students raised in poverty, and he’s zeroing in on helping students develop “working memory.”

In his West Elementary classroom on a Friday morning, Sokol drew a mixing bowl on a whiteboard in front of his students. He asked them to name ingredients needed to make pancakes. They eagerly answered: “eggs,” “baking powder,” “vanilla,” “flour,” “sugar,” as Sokol wrote the list on the bowl.

“If we get those all in the bowl, we are going to be able to do something with them. We are going to be able to make pancakes. But what if there are holes in the bowl?”

He told students to think of their brains like the bowl: They need to be able to use what they put inside. “If you can’t keep those things in your brain, are you going to be able to do anything with them?”

Sokol’s mini-lesson was an introduction to activities aimed to improve students’ working memory. That’s the ability to store and manage information in one’s mind for a short period of time, like remembering a list of items or series of number long enough to apply them to what you need.

During a game called “If I Went,” students named items they would bring to the beach or camping. On their turns, they recalled items named before them in order. “If I went to the beach I would bring food, an air mattress, marshmallows and…,” said Myana Santiago-DeJesus, remembering the items named by her classmates and adding “shelter” to the list.

They also created a string of numbers, adding one at a time, and recalling them with a partner.

Building Working Memory

Students enjoyed the tasks, taking pride in remembering eight, nine, even 10 numbers in a row, and a list of camping items worthy of the Scouts, but Sokol’s purpose is larger than meets the eye. He is hoping to “fill the gap” in memory function caused by the stressors present in many of the lives of students who grow up poor.

Sokol’s work is part of an ongoing study by Kelloggsville staff, administrators and Board of Education members of Eric Jensen’s book, “Teaching with Poverty in Mind.” In Kelloggsville, about 78 percent of students are considered economically disadvantaged, qualifying for free or reduced lunch, and research shows students who grow up in poverty struggle with working memory.

That could be a factor in the stark correlation between poverty and student achievement. An analysis by School News Networkas part of its series “The Burden of Poverty, a Backpack of Heartache,” shows a close correlation between poverty and performance in the 20 school districts in the Kent ISD. In almost all cases, the districts with the lowest family income levels also had the lowest scores on standardized tests.

In his book, Jensen, a former teacher who now presents on brain-based learning, explains that constant stressors affect the developing brain, “creating a devastating cumulative effect.”

“The prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, crucial for learning, cognition and working memory, are the areas of the brain most affected by cortisol, the so-called ‘stress hormone,'” he writes, citing brain research from various sources.

“Experiments have demonstrated that exposure to chronic and acute stress actually shrinks neurons in the brain’s frontal lobes an area that includes the prefrontal cortex and is responsible for such functions as making judgements, planning and regulating impulsivity and can modify and impair the hippocampus in ways that reduce learning capacity.”

Long-Term Focus

The Jensen book study which started by reading and discussing chapters is a long-term project involving ongoing district-wide training, Assistant Superintendent Tammy Savage said.

A Board of Education committee dedicated to poverty is gathering information this year. Administrators and staff members are studying and attending seminars on poverty, have watched a webinar by Jensen and attended a two-day Michigan Department of Education session in November with Jensen on his book. They hope to bring him to Kelloggsville to present.

The goal is to apply some of his strategies in the classroom and embed tools to boost student effort and engagement, Savage said. It’s also about developing empathy and understanding of living situations many teachers haven’t experienced.

The district has long been aware of the high level of need and has worked hard to address it, she said. This is about going deeper and examining poverty from different perspectives. “There are a lot of things we are already doing. That was an affirmation for the district. We are already doing a lot of things to connect with students and parents.”

More than just brain development, training involves developing strong bonds with students, which leads to better achievement. “We are focused on student engagement, and it goes back to building relationships with kids,” Savage said. “Research has always proven that student/teacher relationship is key.”

Teachers are doing fast-track relationship builders, recommended by Jensen, in the classroom. For example, they share something personal with students once a week.

“In order to build a relationship with somebody, it can’t be one-sided. It can’t be just the students sharing,” Savage said. “Teachers have to share about themselves too. The more we share about ourselves, the more students are going to feel connected with us.”

Jensen also recommends staff members provide a favor or a show of empathy so powerful that students remember it well; invest two minutes a day for 10 consecutive days with the student who needs it most; and discover three things other than a name about a student each day, every day of the year.

Read more:
Brain Games: Focusing on Memory to Reduce Effects of Poverty – School News Network

Attack on Titan’s Newest Smartphone Puzzle Game Launches This … – Geek

Attack on Titan is a ridiculously popular show if youre not already aware, and theres plenty to love about it. Theres a new smartphone game collaboration coming through for Japanese gamers, and its called Attack on Titan: Chain Puzzle Fever. Pre-registrations will be opening later this month for an eventual winter release that will be on smartphones, but no word on whether

For the uninitiated, Attack on Titan follows the last bastion of humanity as they eke out an existence within the walls that protect them from enormous, lumbering Titans outside. The Titans devour humans one by one, and the only way they can be stopped is by a swift strike to the neck. You can now pull this off thanks to their Omni-directional Mobility Gear, which gives the tiny humans the ability to zip around their towns and forests with the ease of Spider-Man.

Unfortunately, sometimes that just doesnt work thanks to the Titans extreme speed and strength. The game follows the main storyline of the animes first season, which features friends Eren, Mikasa, and Armin, all whove lost friends and family and many other important things. Theyve been trained for combat with the Titans and set out to fight them off and push them away and out of humanitys last stronghold.

This puzzle game probably wont be that serious, but it should be simple, good fun for Attack on Titan fans. Its also not the only game fans will get to try out soon: the Castle & Dragon smartphone game will have a special collaboration event with Attack on Titan that begins on February 16 and runs through March 2. It will feature the characters Eren and Mikasa with their outfits available for use, a Survey Corps-themed egg, and the Colossal Titan as a boss.

Theres a lot to enjoy about both things if youre an Attack on Titan fan, so look forward to these new games!

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Attack on Titan’s Newest Smartphone Puzzle Game Launches This … – Geek


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