Page 11234..1020..»

Facebook Live with Nat Geo’s Brain Games host Jason Silva at 4PM ET – Blastr

Facebook Live with Nat Geo's Brain Games host Jason Silva at 4PM ET
Blastr
He's also the co-host of National Geographic's Brain Games (picking up the mantle from Neil Patrick Harris' unseen narrator in Season 1) and has been described by The Atlantic as "A Timothy Leary of the Viral Video Age" (which is one of the greatest

See the article here:
Facebook Live with Nat Geo’s Brain Games host Jason Silva at 4PM ET – Blastr

A Puzzle Game About Shuttling Around Alien Pals – Kotaku UK (blog)

Cosmic Express is a cute and surprisingly difficult puzzler about guiding aliens through a space colony. Its easy to pick up and offers a lot of challenge underneath all the bright colors.

The goal is pretty simple: get the aliens where they need to go on a one way track. Each map poses a puzzle with creatures of various colors that need to be dropped off along the track. Clicking and dragging the mouse allows you to draw your pathway. Finding the right order to navigate stops and dodge obstacles starts easy but builds to become one hell of a brain teaser.

One of the best things about Cosmic Express is that you almost always can back out and head to another level or solve a previous puzzles alternate solution. Youre rarely even forced to slam your head against one puzzle for too long if you dont want to.

From my experience with [previous games] I already knew that having levels branch out is really important for a game like this, designer Alan Hazelden said. You always have a choice of levels and youre not just stuck on one level.

Eventually, new complications pile up. There will be airlock doors in your way or aliens that leave behind slime that leave a train car unusable. If you are left scratching your head, its not because the rules are confusing; its because the puzzles are just that tricky.

Im not a puzzle game player. I came for the alien chums. But Cosmic Express has definitely caught my attention with its brain teasers. You can play it on all major operating systems.

Now if I move the slime guy there after I pick up the purple pal…

See the article here:
A Puzzle Game About Shuttling Around Alien Pals – Kotaku UK (blog)

Puyo Puyo Tetris is a Brilliant Puzzle Collaboration – Hardcore Gamer

Tetris is an incredibly well-known puzzle game worldwide, from its iconic music to block piece shapes, most people will immediately recognize a tetromino when they see it. The Puyo Puyo series on the other hand is a widely popular puzzle game in Japan that hasnt gotten nearly as much attention from the western audience. Its first release hit arcades in North America in 1992 and was scarcely seen again until another iteration of the series was released in 2002 for Gameboy Advance. Puyo Puyos last release in the west was over ten years ago on Gamecube, but now the series is making a return to the west in one big puzzle crossover known as Puyo Puyo Tetris.

While Puyo Puyo might not have the worldwide recognition of Tetris, those who like puzzle games likely will notice some very familiar in its gameplay. The name Puyo refers to the round blob looking creatures with eyes, and much like Tetris they fall starting from the top of the screen. Each Puyo is one of five colors, with the basic goal being to make at least four of the same color to touch in order to pop them. It might not seem to challenging a concept, but players will quickly learn that Puyo Puyo is all about dishing out as many combos as possible. Its important to plan ahead, lining up the Puyo in such a way that setting off one set of Puyo popping will lead to multiple others to pop as well, which greatly opponents by filling their screen with grey blocks. Playing in Tetris mode works similarly, as players will want to break multiple lines at once to slow their opponent down before they get out any combos of their own.

Puyo Puyo Tetris has multiple different modes for players to tackle both alone or with a friend. There is the single player story featuring the wide assortment of Puyo Puyo characters, which challenges players to complete an objective or defeat a computer opponent. For a more personal match players can also go the more traditional route by challenging up to three other people at once in either Puyo Puyo or Tetris mode to see who will be the last one standing. Puyo Puyo Tetris also offers two unique modes outside of story that are swap and fusion, which combines both block modesat once.

Typically when playing through the story or challenging a friend players will pick either the Puyo or Tetris blocks to play and cant change in the middle of a match, but fusion mode mixes both modes into one for a chaotic mix of popping Puyos while trying to make lines with Tetris blocks at the same time. Swap mode mixes the two together in a completely different way, having both players first start in either Tetris or Puyo blocksbut after a set amount of time will swap to the other blocks on a completely new board and continue to swap on this set time limit. The mix up in swap mode forces players to simultaneously manage two games at once and keep track of everything thats going on in order to take on their opponent. Not to mention, in addition to all these different modes there are many different rules that can be applied to mix up each match to make each one more challenging and unique than the last.

The mix of both Puyo Puyo and Tetris is a great combination that couldnt be more suited for one another. With multiple different ways to play against computers, friends or even go online and challenge players around the world, Puyo Puyo Tetris has a wide variety of ways to play. Puyo Puyo Tetris even offers multiple tutorials for those looking to learn the basics, and playing through the story mode is a good way newcomers to get used to going up against other players. Whether a fan of one series or just interested in a challenging puzzle title, Puyo Puyo Tetris will deliver and likely surprise those interested in playing. Players can check out Puyo Puyo Tetris coming to Nintendo Switch and PS4 on April 25 for North America and April 28 in PAL regions.

The rest is here:
Puyo Puyo Tetris is a Brilliant Puzzle Collaboration – Hardcore Gamer

Desktop v Mobile the best platforms for online gaming – Live in Limbo

Desktop PC or mobile phone? Whats best for online gaming? Because, lets face it, most games released these days seem to require an internet connection to play. Be it the latest Steam titles, console games, or phone apps, online is increasingly baked into game titles at the point of creation.

From multiplayer lobbiesand team maps to online chat rooms, playing the latest titles means getting and staying online. If only to download critical game fixes that should have been tested during the development stage (wry wave at the Assassins Creed series), an online capability is usually required to enable the best gaming experience that the game can offer.

So, which to pick? Desktop versus phone: two platforms, one winner. Let battle commence.

Horses for courses

Actually, its a false equivalence, so no need for fisticuffs.

The question of which platform is best suited for you as a gamer depends in large part on the kind of games you like to play, and how you like to play them.

Game developers tailor their creations to the platform upon which they will be presented, playing to strengths and sidestepping weaknesses. A game app designed for smartphone play will have far different requirements than a game designed to be played on a high-end PC rig.

The range of games available for phone-based systems is vast and growing all the time. From heavy hitters like Nintendo to a wealth of indie game stables, theres plenty of choice to be had if youre on the hunt for something moreish to while away a coffee break.

How about a round or two of online bingo? Fabulous Bingo offers different game rooms, slots games as well as arewards system based on fab points. Or perhaps youre more of a chess person? In addition to a vast array of straightforward chess games, theres Chess Opening Blunders, a smartphone app for iPhone and Android designed to present you with smart chess puzzles to improve your skills. Or maybe you yearn for an esoteric puzzle game thatll tie your mind in knots. Whatever your preference, if youre looking for a quick yet satisfying burst of online gaming, your gaming tastes will be well catered for in any app store you care to mention. Smartphones(CC BY-ND 2.0)byinternetsense

Mobile games are well-suited to a quick burst of frenetic arcade-style gameplay, with cartoony visuals and lots of scrolling action. Those cabinet-sized game machines from the eighties paved the way for the home console market, which in turn has forged contemporary expectations of casual gaming addictive platformers with smooth parallax scrolling and colourful tile-sliding puzzlers make for a great way to showcase the sugar rush pick-up-and-play nature of what the mobile platform has to offer.

A top-range modern smartphone such as the iPhone 7 Plus ships with a scanty 3 GB of RAM, and an onboard memory which starts at a mere 32 GB. Specs like that would disappoint your average goldfish, but these limitations can be made to work in the platforms favour, and canny game designers pull this trick all the time; its what makes them canny game designers.

Big is better in the Desktop world

Alternatively, should your gaming tastes run to exploring massively immersive worlds where your character might roam all day and night without once bumping into a boundary wall, then you have hardware considerations to take into account. Youre going to be looking at the processing oomph of a high-end PC gaming rig in order to maximise your gaming pleasure. Or indeed to run your game at all.

Open world RPGs are generally anything but pick up and play or at least pick up and play well. They reward solid game hours with a level-based progress system, chaining quests for items and better kit.

If youre the kind of person who rates The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt over Candy Crush, then youre considering taking on a sprawling game that might take upwards of a hundred hours to complete. Thats a massive investment in time and energy and most especially graphics. Without a decent graphics card, your spiffy new game is a world that will remain forever closed off this game and others like it require a bare minimum of 6 GB of RAM, and earmarks hard drive space at around the whopping 40 GB mark. So it wouldnt even fit on a modern smartphone, even if the phone carried sufficient memory to hold it. And this is hardly an untypical example.

Your game, your choice

Horses for course, remember? The two platforms, PC and mobile, are entirely different platforms, built to do different things in different ways and for different reasons. If mobile games represent gaming on the go, then the PC games market is all about settling in for an evening session: a marathon over a sprint.

The gaming race you choose to run is ultimately up to you. Internet connectivity wont be going away anytime soon, so how you get online becomes less important than what you choose to play when youre there. So pick your game and have fun. Thats what its all about, after all.

Original post:
Desktop v Mobile the best platforms for online gaming – Live in Limbo

A Puzzle Game About Shuttling Around Alien Pals – Kotaku – Kotaku

GIF

Cosmic Express is a cute and surprisingly difficult puzzler about guiding aliens through a space colony. Its easy to pick up and offers a lot of challenge underneath all the bright colors. Its this weeks indie pick!

The goal is pretty simple: get the aliens where they need to go on a one way track. Each map poses a puzzle with creatures of various colors that need to be dropped off along the track. Clicking and dragging the mouse allows you to draw your pathway. Finding the right order to navigate stops and dodge obstacles starts easy but builds to become one hell of a brain teaser.

One of the best things about Cosmic Express is that you almost always can back out and head to another level or solve a previous puzzles alternate solution. Youre rarely even forced to slam your head against one puzzle for too long if you dont want to.

From my experience with [previous games] I already knew that having levels branch out is really important for a game like this, designer Alan Hazelden said. You always have a choice of levels and youre not just stuck on one level.

Eventually, new complications pile up. There will be airlock doors in your way or aliens that leave behind slime that leave a train car unusable. If you are left scratching your head, its not because the rules are confusing; its because the puzzles are just that tricky.

Im not a puzzle game player. I came for the alien chums. But Cosmic Express has definitely caught my attention with its brain teasers. You can play it on all major operating systems.

Now if I move the slime guy there after I pick up the purple pal…

Each week, I show off a new, affordable indie game using the tag Heathers Indie Pick.

If youve found a cool game or made something youre proud of, reach out to me at heather.alexandra@kotaku.com or on Twitter @transgamerthink.

See the original post here:
A Puzzle Game About Shuttling Around Alien Pals – Kotaku – Kotaku

Wordbrain is like hide-and-seek, but with words – Windows Central


Windows Central
Wordbrain is like hide-and-seek, but with words
Windows Central
The free game has 580 word puzzle levels that progressively become more challenging and supports 15 languages. You build the words from square grids of letters, much like you would with Wordament. The key difference being that you are searching for a …

Read the original:
Wordbrain is like hide-and-seek, but with words – Windows Central

‘Pan-Pan’ Review – An Open-World Puzzle Game with Whacking – Touch Arcade

While the last open-world puzzle adventure I reviewed had the torches and pitchforks out for me, I do love the concept of like, a Metroidvania style puzzle-adventure. Take Pan-Pan [$3.99], a weird little game that has you crash-landing on a strange planet. The parts of your ship that can be used by your crew to repair your jalopy and get back into flying are scattered all about. So, you have to set out and discover just what’s going on, solving weird puzzles along the way in an open world. It’s a game that is rather charming, and can be a bit frustrating due to some design decisions, but it’s a fun experience to check out.

In Pan-Pan, you start off with nothing. You can trigger switches, and pick up a few objects, but that’s about it early on. The puzzles in Pan-Pan can be rather esoteric, and a big reason for that is because the game is very much centered around having zero speech whatsoever in the game. So, there’s no text hints or dialogue to check to solve the puzzles. There are in-world hints, but because they’ve all been represented visually, you have to interpret them for yourself. And often, that’s a challenge. At least localization was easy!

The developers had to do a bang-up job on figuring out how to get characterization out of just sound effects and animation. This game is rather charming, with lots of little animation touches and a gorgeous, vibrant landscape, that helps make this a world worth experiencing. Control-wise, I thought it was interesting to make this a portrait game, considering this was on PC (so walkthroughs do exist already!), but it makes sense for iPhone play in particular. It would be nice to have landscape on iPad, but it’s not a dealbreaker. You tap to move to the designated spot, and topping objects picks them up or manipulates them in whatever available way. You can pinch to zoom, or use the magnifying glass option to zoom in. There’s also a one-finger zoom option you can use. Overall, a solid mobile port.

One puzzle solution that’s frustrating to deal with is when you have to help get a robot from one place to another. You solve the puzzle, and get the robot up and boring through a wall. And then it’s just kind of stuck there. The solution is to leave the area, and then come back when it has made its way through. Which, I guess if you just leave in frustration that you can’t find the solution, and then return, is the solution in and of itself, but it is also rather annoying to deal with! Some of the puzzles make sense, but another, where you have to match colored blocks to a particular switch, and there’s no obvious clue as to how to line them up. Experimentation, or peeking at walkthroughs, is the key. Or maybe zooming in really close. This game is brain-breaking for a long time.

Pan-Pan really starts to open up once you get the stick. Yeah, pretty much just a stick. But it gives you a new form of interaction with the world that at least makes any point where you might be stuck on a puzzle feel a bit more accessible because you can possibly solve your problem by hitting it. Also, thwacking stuff with the stick feels really good. Like, it’s amusing to go around to people in the world, and just smack ’em out of nowhere for no good reason beyond it being amusing. And oh it is amusing.

It also leads to a puzzle that is hilarious and kind of horrifying. So, you come across a bird with three eggs in a room with four switches. The solution, spoiler alert, is to put the eggs on the three switches and then run and stand on the fourth. The problem is that the bird will come and take the eggs back, all set to comical music. This puzzle seems difficult to solve before you have your trusty whacking stick. Then, you obtain the stick, and solve the puzzle by whacking the bird upside the head, giving it a freaking concussion, in order to steal its unborn young in order to solve a puzzle. It’s somewhere between horrifying and amusing.

Regardless, once you have an interaction option that’s more than just doing one thing with anything in the game, it feels like solutions are a bit more in grasp. You can experiment, see what needs to be hit and what isn’t. The second half of Pan-Pan is almost easier because it’s just more encouraging to have more options in your grasp. That, and because the game is open world, you can go back to puzzles that seemed unsolvable and give them a good whack.

Pan-Pan is technically non-linear. There are some elements where you need elements from other puzzles to open up the world, or you need the stick for whackering, but you otherwise aren’t forced to do much. So, even if you do get stuck, there’s perhaps something that has happened in another part of the game world that allows you to go and explore that. Though this can be frustrating if it feels like you should be making more progress on a puzzle than you should be. Once you collect all the items in the game, in whatever order you acquire and place them in the base, the game ends. It’s a bit anticlimactic, but not to a souring degree. If anything, adding more to do would feel tacked-on, I bet. Still, I’d loved to have seen more of Pan-Pan.

This is an interesting game that I had a good time with. Also, there’s a lot of whacking stuff with a stick, which is especially satisfying. Heck, the joy of whacking stuff with a stick justifies much of the experience. I recommend Pan-Pan, and hope Spelkraft has more mobile titles planned in the future!

See original here:
‘Pan-Pan’ Review – An Open-World Puzzle Game with Whacking – Touch Arcade

Family-run indie studio launches Tetris Attack-inspired puzzle fighter – Develop

Cousins make spiritual successor to Tetris Attack, attempt to reclaim the fun of retro puzzle games with Super Plexis.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NAPLES, March 20th, 2017 – Gabe and Andrew are likely the only game developers in their city Naples, a corner of south Florida with a disproportionate elderly population. Aged 26 and 19 respectively, the cousins saw a chance to fill a niche that was sorely lacking in today’s mobile game market: a fun, fast, skill-based puzzle game like the ones they grew up playing on the Super Nintendo. Super Plexis was their response to the slow, greedy, lowest-common-denominator match-3 games that plague mobile app stores today.

“As console/PC gamers ourselves, we wanted to bring something new to the table . . . something we would actually want to play on our phones,” shared Gabe, the artist and sound designer for Super Plexis, “We reflected back on what we loved about Super Nintendo games, they were fun and welcoming but with hidden depth and challenge.” The premise of the game will sound familiar to fans of Tetris Attack or the Puzzle League series: Versus-style battles with match-3 puzzle mechanics. Blocks can be moved freely so there’s no stopping and scanning for possible moves; instead, you have to think fast set up your own chain reactions to trigger more powerful attacks. Players can also choose characters with specific stats, abilities, and counters. Gabe thinks this excitement is what’s missing from modern puzzle games, “We enjoy games like League of Legends and Starcraft for that competitive adrenaline rush, so including online multiplayer and matchmaking was a must.” But a full-fledged single-player “Adventure” mode also exists for players not ready to hop online straight away.

The team has big plans for the future of Super Plexis, the first of which involves bringing the game to other devices. “The response from players so far has been very positive, along with lots of demand for a version for Android phones,” said Andrew, the lead programmer and engineer of the team, “We built our game engine from scratch so restructuring all the code to go multi-platform is no small task.” To support themselves during this next stage of development, the team launched a campaign on Kickstarter. Andrew added, “It’s an uphill battle in the mobile market, its very stigmatized, but we think after 2 years of work, we’ve really got something special if they’re willing to give it a try!”

Super Plexis Beta on the App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/super-plexis/id1155953418?mt=8

Kickstarter Link: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1997496052/super-plexis-a-retro-puzzle-action-fighter?ref=nav_search

###

About Medley Studio:

Medley Studio is a family-run video game company based in Naples, FL. Started by cousins Gabriel Basham and Andrew Gundlach, their first game Super Plexis is a throwback to classic puzzle games and is currently available on iOS.

Press Contact:

Name: Gabe Basham, Andrew Gundlach

Phone: 239-404-4051, 980-422-4633

Email: medley.studio.llc@gmail.com

Games Press is the leading online resource for games journalists. Used daily by magazines, newspapers, TV, radio, online media and retailers worldwide, it offers a vast, constantly updated archive of press releases and assets, and is the simplest and most cost-effective way for PR professionals to reach the widest possible audience. Registration for the site and the Games Press email digest is available, to the trade only, at http://www.gamespress.com

View post:
Family-run indie studio launches Tetris Attack-inspired puzzle fighter – Develop

Can You Solve The Rabbit Race Riddle? Sunday Puzzle

A group of 10 rabbits enjoys racing against each other, but the group also has a friendly spirit. The rabbits plan races so that each rabbit “beats” every other rabbit.

Note: rabbit A “beats” rabbit B if rabbit A finishes at least one spot ahead of rabbit B in some race; rabbit A does not have to win the race–it only has to finish ahead of rabbit B in some race.

A simple solution is the group plans 10 races where each rabbit finishes first in a race. But is there a more efficient method?

What is the minimum number of races so that each rabbit can claim to beat every other rabbit?

For the minimum number, how many different ways can they plan the races?

What if there are n rabbits? How many races are needed, and how many ways can they plan the races? (n > 1)

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Rabbit Race Riddle?

Or keep reading.

.
.
.
.
M
I
N
D
.
Y
O
U
R
.
D
E
C
I
S
I
O
N
S
.
P
U
Z
Z
L
E
.
.
.
.
Answer To Rabbit Race Puzzle

I thought about solving the problem for 2 rabbits, numbered 1 and 2. Naturally there will need to be 2 races, written from last place to first place:

1, 2
2, 1

If rabbit 3 joins the group, that rabbit has to beat the other rabbits and it also has to lose to both of them. This can be accomplished by appending 3 to the front of the first race and to the end of the second race:

1, 2, 3
3, 2, 1

Each subsequent rabbit can be added similarly, so it appears 2 races are sufficient.

You may have also come across the answer by luck. Suppose the first race has the rabbits in sequential:

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

In the next race, we need rabbit 1 to beat all other rabbits, rabbit 2 to beat all other rabbits except rabbit 1, rabbit 3 to beat all rabbits except 1 and 2, and so on. This suggests a race with the in the reverse order finish:

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

And that’s it! In the first race, each rabbit beats all rabbits with a lower number; in the second race, each rabbit beats all rabbits with a higher number. Together, each rabbit finishes ahead of every other rabbit in some race.

This shows that 2 races are sufficient. Furthermore, 2 races are minimal: in a single race, there is a last place rabbit who loses to everyone, so at least one more race is needed for that rabbit to beat all of the other rabbits.

How many different ways can the rabbits plan the races? The finishing order in a race is a permutation of the numbers 1 to 10. There are 10 × 9 × 8 × … × 1 = 10! permutations. Then, for a given permutation, the second race is found as the reverse order of the first race.

Thus, there are 10! ways to determine the races with this property.

The problem generalizes with the same logic. For n rabbits, the group again needs 2 races minimally (some ordering and then its reverse ordering), and those minimal races can be planned in n! different ways.

Source

I received this problem by email from Stephan who translated it from German. Stephan read it in a German Newspaper that got it from the German Mind / Logic Games Website called http://www.denksport.de

Here is the original post:
Can You Solve The Rabbit Race Riddle? Sunday Puzzle

Interview: Jason Silva talks Origins and why we need science shows more than ever – Monsters and Critics.com

Jason Silva in Origins: The Journey of Humankind. Pic: Nat Geo

Fans of Brain Games and the YouTube series Shots of Awe will be glad to see that host Jason Silva has a new project the NatGeo series Origins: The Journey of Humankind (Mondays at 9/8c).

We sat down with the self-described wonder junkie to talk about what his new shows about, why its important, and why we need it and other science-themed programming now more than ever.

Monsters & Critics: What was the origin of Origins: The Journey of Humankind?

Jason Silva: Its the story of how we got to where we are. Its the story of human life from a modern lens tracing back our origins.

Really, were looking at all the next big things at moments that made humanity humanity.

So, we have an episode all about fire; what fire is. We have this natural physiological relationship with fire from when we first domesticated fire and it started acting as an external stomach.

It pre-digested our food. Every meal became more energy efficient so we could stay for longer without cooking.

We wouldnt have developed culture or arts or language if we were just foraging, eating anything that we find.

We basically had to forage all day and eat all day and it was only when we started cooking that all of a sudden there was time for leisure and culture.

So think of that as a metaphor for all the artifacts, all the inventions, all the technology, all the cultural innovations that emerged from the human mind that we designed, so to speak, and that designed us right back.

M&C: So weve been physically designed by early changes in how we once lived?

JS: With the advent of stone tools after many generations my jaw is physically shrinking. Yeah, theres a physiological effect of artifacts in our technology.

Like the philosopher Marshall McLuhan said, they would build the tools and the tools build us.

So, back to the episode on fire. We used to carry fire, and without it logically all of human culture wouldnt happen.

So then we have an episode on transportation and then we have an episode on money. Money is a complete cultural, symbolic construct.

Its a consensus hallucination, a consensus trance without which we would not be able to exchange values.

But nonetheless, imagine the imagination we needed to allow the world to become what it is.

Imagination is a capacity to imagine things together, to share hallucinations that allow us to bring those things in a super group.

But at the same time without it we wouldnt be able to collaborate and work toward things that are beyond our lifespan, things that dont neatly feed us or shelter us, towork for things for our legacy or for humanity.

The neocortex is thinking about the future, and that allows for usto exceed basic needs and to move beyond physical needs to take care of those basic things and then be concerned with higher goals.

A moment from Origins: The Journey of Humankind. Pic: Nat Geo

M&C: Is Brain Games on hold?

JS: Theres been no official announcement whether its on or is coming back.

But, you know, as of now its just like were doing brain art. Were doing very well. And then well see

M&C: What else are you doing now?

JS: I do an insane amount of public speaking to technology companies, mostly IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Oracle and Cisco, to inspire audiences and to talk about the future of technology. I do a lot of them about innovation and creativity disruption.

So its real for me, because I think that the success of Brain Games has positioned me as sort of the popularizer of science and tech, and my digital following online is associated with celebrating big ideas.

Because Im very much in demand Im on the road all the time, so Im not shooting as much.

Though I like to think I get inspiration for, especially my digital ideas, everywhere.

M&C: Is Origins your way of bringing Shots of Awe to the TV-watching public?

JS: Its short-form, frenetic, visual, mind-brain explosion stretching into an hour-long show.

The concept here was, well, Jason will do his thing, and then well have these cinematic re-tellings and they will come back to you and do your thing, and then its done. So Im interested to see how the format plays out.

I think the idea of a feature-length documentary can be exciting. So thats definitely something that I can take a dive into.

M&C: This is an expensive-looking show. It really has a feature-film feel to it.

JS: There is this corporate reinvention, and theyve really decided to commit to premium adventure science and exploration.

I think thats because in the age of YouTube, you better go premium if you want to retain eyeballs.

Youve got to be offering something that nobody else can offer. And so its really exciting, and for me its great because Ive always beenan ideas guy.

M&C: Is there a need for more science-based TV?

JS: I think now its more important than ever to make sure we keep pushing, raging against the darkness.

But the great thing about this show is that it doesnt seem like its giving a lecture.

M&C: Is having a science-based show now more important than it used to be?

JS: Absolutely. I mean, we have to be offering alternatives to the prevailing anti-science narratives that were seeing more or more.

I think that people like the press are players, you know, so why not make celebrities out of thinkers?

Turning thinkers into celebrities, I think, is awesome. I just think more of getting people like Ron Howard and Chris Nolan with their films and ideas out there, and that what they bring is important. You know, Carl Sagan is one of my heroes.

M&C: And youre following in his footsteps.

JS: Im trying, you know, Im trying.

Origins: The Journey of Humankind airs Mondays at 9/8c on National Geographic.

See the original post:
Interview: Jason Silva talks Origins and why we need science shows more than ever – Monsters and Critics.com


Page 11234..1020..»