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‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – Washington Post

By Christopher Byrd By Christopher Byrd May 26

Rime Developed by: Tequila Softworks Published by: Grey Box Available on: Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One

Rime is a game about the acceptance of loss. In a 2014 interview with Polygon, Ral Rubio Munrriz, the games creative director, recalled how the idea for the game came to him while he was drowning in the Mediterranean Sea. (According to the Spanish game developer, he swam out to a buoy and was seized by a panic attack, which left his future brother-in-law to save him.) Like many who report having a near-death experience, it brought Rubio clarity. For us as creators we have reached the end of an era of shooting and explosions which was all great, but now we are starting to question ourselves in the world, he said in 2014. And, in an interview this month with Gamesindustrybiz he said: Thats why you have games like That Dragon, Cancer or Papers, Please, because theyre not trying to entertain you and thats one step above Hollywood cinema. Were trying to transmit you a personal message.

The first few scenes in Rime convey three essential aspects of nature: its mystery, danger, and beauty. The opening shot is of a star-encrusted sky. Then the camera lowers to reveal grey, storm-lit clouds above a violent sea. A scrap of red cloth flies in front of the camera before the scene fades to white and transitions to a blue sky. A broken marble tower comes into view that overlooks tree-dotted cliffs and a pristine beach on which lies the solitary figure of a young boy. Enu is dressed in a tunic, like a boy in a picture book about ancient Greece, and what appears to be a torn red cape. With effort he lifts himself to his feet.

As Enu, players explore the beautifully realized island. Swim a bit beyond the shore in the beginning of the game and youll see an unidentifiable person wrapped in a red cloak standing on a high rock jutting out of the water. The mysterious figure acts as a through-line for the game which contains no dialogue. Rather, the emotional texture of Rimes bare bones plot is primarily conveyed through incidents and environmental details. Ascend a gleaming marble staircase, for instance, and you might notice murals on either side one of a distressed man with a crown on his head, and another of a boy in a red cape cradling his head in his hands.

Though it lacks hack-and-slash combat, Rime is a puzzle-adventure game similar to Zelda. I delighted in how the games puzzles built on each other. Aside from acting as mere gateways between areas, a number of the puzzles immerse the player in the games aesthetics. There are puzzles that manipulate time, so that one can scroll through the games day-night cycle and revel in its fantastic evocation of Mediterranean light. Rime also signals its artistic values via puzzles that require you to place things on pedestals. Although there were numerous times I had to step away from the game to gain a fresh perspective on a puzzle, I almost invariably found that when I returned to it, I was able to swiftly grasp the solution a rhythm I value in puzzle games.

The most perilous parts of Enus journey rarely got my pulse up, and I dont mean that as a put-down. There is a tranquility to Rime reminiscent of Fumito Uedas games. Clearly, the developers went all in on developing an eye-catching art style, abstract yet sensible puzzles and intricately designed environments. Although the central plot arc can be summed up in a sentence (I wont because I dont want to spoil it for you), its the experience of the game that counts. The gradations of colors in Rimes green-blue sea or in its bluish-purple nighttime sky are more expressive than in some other video games. At its core, Rime, is really nothing more and nothing less than an opportunity to roam around a beautiful environment and work through its strange logic.

Christopher Byrd is a Brooklyn-based writer who has been playing video games since the days of the Atari 2600. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Barnes & Noble Review, Al Jazeera America, the Guardian and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter@Chris_Byrd.

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Pinstripe An Adventure Through Hell is an indie game funded by Kickstarter and worth your attention

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is a not-quite successful marriage of an old favorite and a new platform

See original here:
‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – Washington Post

‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – SFGate

Christopher Byrd, The Washington Post

Photo: Courtesy Of Grey Box.

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss.

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss.

‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure

Rime

Developed by: Tequila Softworks

Published by: Grey Box

Available on: Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss. In a 2014 interview with Polygon, Ral Rubio Munrriz, the game’s creative director, recalled how the idea for the game came to him while he was drowning in the Mediterranean Sea. (According to the Spanish game developer, he swam out to a buoy and was seized by a panic attack, which left his future brother-in-law to save him.) Like many who report having a near-death experience, it brought Rubio clarity. “For us as creators we have reached the end of an era of shooting and explosions which was all great, but now we are starting to question ourselves in the world,” he said in 2014. And, in an interview this month with Gamesindustrybiz he said: “That’s why you have games like ‘That Dragon, Cancer’ or ‘Papers, Please,’ because they’re not trying to entertain you and that’s one step above Hollywood cinema. We’re trying to transmit you a . . . personal message.”

The first few scenes in “Rime” convey three essential aspects of nature: its mystery, danger, and beauty. The opening shot is of a star-encrusted sky. Then the camera lowers to reveal grey, storm-lit clouds above a violent sea. A scrap of red cloth flies in front of the camera before the scene fades to white and transitions to a blue sky. A broken marble tower comes into view that overlooks tree-dotted cliffs and a pristine beach on which lies the solitary figure of a young boy. Enu is dressed in a tunic, like a boy in a picture book about ancient Greece, and what appears to be a torn red cape. With effort he lifts himself to his feet.

As Enu, players explore the beautifully realized island. Swim a bit beyond the shore in the beginning of the game and you’ll see an unidentifiable person wrapped in a red cloak standing on a high rock jutting out of the water. The mysterious figure acts as a through-line for the game which contains no dialogue. Rather, the emotional texture of “Rime’s” bare bones plot is primarily conveyed through incidents and environmental details. Ascend a gleaming marble staircase, for instance, and you might notice murals on either side – one of a distressed man with a crown on his head, and another of a boy in a red cape cradling his head in his hands.

Though it lacks hack-and-slash combat, “Rime” is a puzzle-adventure game similar to “Zelda.” I delighted in how the game’s puzzles built on each other. Aside from acting as mere gateways between areas, a number of the puzzles immerse the player in the game’s aesthetics. There are puzzles that manipulate time, so that one can scroll through the game’s day-night cycle and revel in its fantastic evocation of Mediterranean light. “Rime” also signals its artistic values via puzzles that require you to place things on pedestals. Although there were numerous times I had to step away from the game to gain a fresh perspective on a puzzle, I almost invariably found that when I returned to it, I was able to swiftly grasp the solution – a rhythm I value in puzzle games.

The most perilous parts of Enu’s journey rarely got my pulse up, and I don’t mean that as a put-down. There is a tranquility to “Rime” reminiscent of Fumito Ueda’s games. Clearly, the developers went all in on developing an eye-catching art style, abstract yet sensible puzzles and intricately designed environments. Although the central plot arc can be summed up in a sentence (I won’t because I don’t want to spoil it for you), it’s the experience of the game that counts. The gradations of colors in “Rime’s” green-blue sea or in its bluish-purple nighttime sky are more expressive than in some other video games. At its core, “Rime,” is really nothing more and nothing less than an opportunity to roam around a beautiful environment and work through its strange logic.

– – –

Byrd is a Brooklyn-based writer who has been playing video games since the days of the Atari 2600. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Barnes & Noble Review, Al Jazeera America, the Guardian and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter @Chris_Byrd.

See the rest here:
‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – SFGate

Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets’ brains in gear – Sacramento Bee

Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets' brains in gear
Sacramento Bee
Is there anything more fun than watching a pet play? Whether the game is fetching a ball, tugging on a rope toy, killing a soft toy, wrestling with a pal or working to solve a puzzle toy, it's fascinating to see how play mimics key real-life

Link:
Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets’ brains in gear – Sacramento Bee

‘Rime’ review – Digital Trends

Some of the most interesting indie games of the last few years have focused on channeling the emotional power of interactive storytelling. Where AAA games have focused on recapturing the nostalgia of games from 30 years ago, or trying to squeeze the most jump scares into 20 minutes, games like What Remains of Edith Finch, Abzu, Journey and Insidehave used the language of video games running, jumping, sliding, fighting to deliver very particular feelings.

Tequila Works Rime draws much of its inspiration from that well. On the surface, Rime is an action-adventure puzzle game, with climbing and running and pushing boxes into their correct positions to open doors. What its trying to deliver, though, is a specific set of feelings mostly captured in art direction and music.

Explaining the exact feelings and emotions Rime hopes to instill in you would take away from its journey across a gorgeous island, over a sun-bleached desert, and through a shadowy, rain-drenched necropolis. The emotional themes of the games five main areas arent clear until you complete the game and see the whole picture.

But Rimes dedication to those themes, and its careful deployment of beautiful imagery and swelling music, is just enough to make a fun, mostly pleasant puzzle title stand out from the crowd.

The surface-level premise of Rime finds a shipwrecked child stranded on a Mediterranean-esque island, trying to figure out what to do about the situation. Not far from where they awaken is a gleaming white tower surrounded by ruins and statues. A friendly, strangely magical fox appears to lead them to the tower, and with no prompting or dialogue at all, its off to solve puzzles to find the way forward.

That part of the game the actual puzzle-solving is competent and enjoyable, but ultimately pretty lightweight. To Rimes credit, the game simply throws puzzle after puzzle at you Theres no explanation given, and none necessary. The first one, for instance, brings the child into a large open space with four strange statues surrounding a fifth larger one. What needs to be done isnt immediately clear, but look around and pillars of green light reaching into the sky will attract your attention. Wander off to find out what they are, and youre soon climbing Uncharted-style until you reach the lights, which are actually produced by more statutes, colored in jade.

Each green statue is clearly important, but what to do with them? A quick expeRimental round of button presses and you discover that one makes the child shout. Their wordless voice carries some kind of power to activate the statues, sending a green spirit flittering back toward the five original statues. With one cleared, its off to find the others and surmount their challenges like a path blocked by brambles thats cleared by tossing fruit to lure a warthog to barrel through, or using special orbs to amplify the childs voice and make it carry further.

These lighter puzzles work here, as they do in games like Inside, because the world carries them.

Puzzle design in Rime is smart and tight, but also not especially demanding. Youll almost always instantly understand what the game wants of you as soon as you look around a room. If you dont, momentary trial and error, or maybe more accurately, following the only open path, will make the next step obvious.

These lighter puzzles work here, as they do in games like Inside, because the world carries them. In some of the games chapters, the puzzles meld with the games unfolding, wordless narrative in a way that makes both feel like essential parts of the experience.

At the same time, the high points also illuminate the fact that many of the puzzles arent engrossing in their own right. While it is great that everything is tightly built, the puzzles sometimes unravel too easily. Youll never have to take a step back and try to view the game in a new light, because almost every solution will be clear at first glance. When you can intuit the answer to a problem almost immediately, it makes actually going through the motions of solving it feel like exactly that: Going through the motions.

Its what Rime does in between puzzles, and what it says through visuals and music and never with dialogue, that makes it interesting, though. Sweeping camera angles show off ruined towers and crashing waves in one chapter, and pan to capture a huge pterodactyl-looking bird swooping down to snag the child in its clutches in another.

Rimes moment-to-moment play feels like Journey in that mix of interactivity, beautiful vistas, and rising orchestra. Rime is about the place youre in and how it feels to be there, more than the video game elements of constantly clearing tasks. Riffing on that same Journey feel are the few characters you meet along the way, like the fox, some strange, shadowy creatures that often flee if you get too close to them, and giant two-legged robots, one of whom follows you around opening doors for a chapter.

That part of the experience works well. The slowly unfolding story of the shipwreck, of the child, and where they find themself is enough to carry the game forward, as is the mystery of the symbolism presented in each chapter. Tequila Works does a great job on presentation in Rime, and coupled with solid gameplay throughout, its a compelling experience.

The game might even work better with a second playthrough, once the games ending has had a chance to recontextualize what players have seen up to that point, in order to better track the symbolism and artistic choices made throughout Rimes earlier levels. This might serve as a strike against it, if not for the fact that Rime can be picked up and completed in a few scant hours it took me between three and four, although I was only making a cursory attempt at finding the games many collectibles, some of which expand on the story and slightly alter the endgame.

Rime is one of those game experiences that takes the traditional elements of a video game, and wields them as a tool for evoking emotion and delivering metaphor. Its a noble ambition that can push the medium forward, and Rime achieves a lot with its art direction, its music, and the strange and interesting world it weaves. All the moving parts of the game might not add up perfectly, but Rime certainly conjures a world thats worth a wander.

Is there a better alternative?

Rime falls in line with narrative-driven puzzle games, such as Limbo, Inside, Journey, and The Unfinished Swan. Players drawn to those games will enjoy this as well, as it does some smart things with its gameplay and presentation to stand among the ranks of similar titles.

How long will it last?

Our playthrough lasted somewhere between three and four hours, but your play-time may vary depending on how much time you spend exploring the games world, and how easily you adapt to the games puzzles. If you uncover every secret, and explore every place, the game could last six hours or more.

Plus, as we mentioned in the review, the game almost begs for a second playthrough.

Should you buy it?

Yes, especially if youre looking for short, refreshing change of pace between giant AAA games.

See the article here:
‘Rime’ review – Digital Trends

The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Mr. White, Mr. Blue, Mr. Brown, and Mr. Pink are at a restaurant.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

What color shirt was each person wearing?

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle?

Or keep reading.

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Answer To The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle

Let’s analyze what each person states.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

Mr. Pink’s statement implies the shirt colors are white, blue, brown, and pink. So we can set up a logical grid as follows.

Furthermore, no one’s name matches the color of their shirt. This eliminates the diagonal entries in the grid.

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

The next statement implies Mr. Pink is not wearing a blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

Furthermore, Mr. Pink is not wearing a dark colored shirt, so Mr. Pink is also not wearing a brown shirt. By process of elimination, Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

This also means no one else is wearing a white shirt.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

We still have 3 people and 3 shirts to decide. Amazingly, this last statement allows us to solve the problem.

First, we can deduce that Mr. Brown is not wearing a blue shirt, as Mr. Brown dislikes his name and the person in the blue shirt was indifferent to what anyone’s name was. This means Mr. Brown must be wearing a pink shirt.

This implies no one else was wearing a pink shirt. Also, since the other 3 are not wearing the blue shirt, Mr. White must be wearing the blue shirt.

Thus, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt.

Thus we have the answer. Mr. White is wearing a blue shirt, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt, Mr. Brown is wearing a pink shirt, and Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

Source
This problem is a variation of Martin Gardner’s puzzle about dress colors
http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/2182228/ms-black-ms-blue-and-ms-green-is-there-really-a-unique-answer

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The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central


Windows Central
Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10
Windows Central
In search of a Windows 10 puzzle game full of optical illusions to master? Kubic might fit the bill with over 60 geometric challenges. Available for Windows 10 PC and Mobile, Kubic delivers a host of mind-boggling puzzles inspired by M.C. Escher's art.

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Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central

Disney Interactive Launches New ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Puzzle Game App – The Kingdom Insider

Disney Interactive has announced a new puzzle game based on the live-action Beauty and the Beast.

Beauty and the Beast: Perfect Match is a match 3 game thats reminiscent of games like Bejeweled Blitz, or if youre truly oldschool, Columns for the Sega Genesis.

From the official website

The game is now available for download on iOS and Android devices.

You can learn more about Beauty and the Beast: Perfect Match on the official website.

Cant get enough of Beauty and the Beast? The live-action movie is coming to home video on June 6.

I’ve loved Disney as long as I can remember. As a former newspaper editor, web developer, and Disney comics freelancer, I’m able to combine that experience into writing about Disney online. I’m also the co-host of a Disney fan podcast called ‘Pirates & Princesses.’ Opinions mine.

See more here:
Disney Interactive Launches New ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Puzzle Game App – The Kingdom Insider

List of best puzzle games to challenge your brain – Gizbot

Published: Thursday, May 18, 2017, 9:03 [IST]

Puzzle games are one of the most interesting genres that have been evolved, finding new and different ways to test out brains. In fact, these puzzle games can be played easily on your mobile phones without demanding higher graphic card or processor.

Today, we have picked 5 puzzle games that you can try on your smartphone when you are bored or traveling.

Stay tuned to GizBot for more updates!

The classic 2048 puzzle is a fun, addictive and a very simple number puzzle game. Basically, you have to Swipe (Up, Down, Left, Right) to move the tiles. When two tiles with the same number touch, they merge into one. When 2048 tile is created, the player wins! The UI of the game is pretty simple and easy to use.

In this game, the user needs to help a tiny robot stumble home through 50 puzzling mechanical dioramas. The size of the game is too small and you can download it for free. Each one has a collectible card that you can get upon completion. It features a good graphic with some puzzle elements.

This game is more of a Chess, but with no rules at all. Unlike, Chess, this game is easy to play but it’s tough to get results that favor you (which is win). Further, this game demands your decision-making skills to finish off the game. The Checkers game hardly consume around 2MB of your mobile storage with decent graphics.

This calculative puzzle game comes with short time puzzle to kill your time during commutation, waiting for bus or train. It can be played by all age groups which helps in improving your mathematics as well as decision-making skills. In this game just you need to slide number blocks and like numbers in multiple of 3 will add up automatically.

Stay tuned to GizBot for more updates!

Continued here:
List of best puzzle games to challenge your brain – Gizbot

Puyo Puyo Tetris review: puzzle game titans are better together – The Sydney Morning Herald

Mashing the well-known, meticulous play of Tetris together with some other totally different puzzle game sounds like a recipe for disaster, but Sega’s Sonic Teamhas done just that and made Tetris the most enjoyable it’s been in years.

A party-ready puzzle game with heaps of modes and content to keep you busy, Puyo Puyo Tetris introduces Western gamers to an incredibly popular Japanese franchise, while also providing familiarity via its familiar block-fallingtwist.

For the unfamiliar, Puyo Puyo is an addictive, competitive game that challenges playersto match coloured balls of goo in order to clear the screen. Crafty combos send hard-to-remove garbage blocks to opponents, filling matches with tense risk/reward strategies. Outside of this core gameplay, the series is known for its quirky anime-style characters and odd-ball narrative, as well as its various alternative game modes.

While attempts were made to bring an English language version of the puzzle format to Sega and Nintendo platforms in the mid-nineties (disguised as Dr Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine and Kirby’s Ghost Trap respectively), none of the main entries in the 25-year-old series have actually made it out of Japan.

Of course Tetris, by contrast, is verywell known in Australia and around the world, and this mash-up provides plenty of great ways to play that game alone or with up to three friends. But the real star of the show is the smart way the two games collide.

My favourite mode to play with friends, for example, is Swap. This has players switching between bothgames at timed intervals, testing their ability to manage both rule-sets and be the last one standing.

Also fun is the classic Versus mode, where each playeris free to choose whether they’ll compete by playing Tetris or Puyo Puyo. Against all odds, games do feel competitive and cohesive even though the players are playing totally different games, with the Puyo players building towards a massive waterfall of combos and the Tetris players meticulously trying to slot in that last block that will give them a five-line Tetris.

Of course to make the two games compatible with each other some flexibility is required, and the version of Tetris here isn’t exactly the same asyou may remember from your Game Boy. Fortunately, I think the game is largely improved thanks to its PuyoPuyo influences.

The biggest change is that removing multiple lines at once will send garbage tiles to your opponent, making the incentive to line up a five-linereven greater. Garbage lobbed at you from an opponent will appear as grey tiles at the bottom of your board that must be painstakingly removed lest they force you into a game over.

Many of the other modes, including Party and Fusion, mix the games more directly by having Tetrominos and Puyos appear together on the same game board. This can make for some hectic fun, but is a bit too messy to be as satisfying as the other game styles.

The most surprisingly full-featured mode is thePuyo-Puyo-style Adventure mode,which isfully voiced and introduces a new cast of characters from an alternative dimension whereTetris, notPuyoPuyo, is the world’s greatest obsession.

The story’s totally daft (as expected), but the characters and performances are charming. Each level sets up a challenge that players will be awarded between one and three stars for completing, so perfectionists will likely spend hours here.

Elsewhere the game even features a range of lessons to teach players the finer points of each game, and an online suite where you can take on the world.

This is certainly a Puyo Puyogame at heartwith chatty cartoon characters and fast-paced competitive fun prioritised over high scoresand analytical block-droppingbut Tetrisfans shouldn’t be too quick to dismiss it. After years of attempts to freshen upAlexeyPajitnov’s formula, with incredibly mixed results, this game delivers the most fun puzzle experience to bear the Tetris name in a very long time.

Puyo PuyoTetris is out now for Nintendo Switch (reviewed) and PlayStation 4.

Go here to see the original:
Puyo Puyo Tetris review: puzzle game titans are better together – The Sydney Morning Herald

Form is a VR puzzle game that’s all in the mind – Polygon

Form is a virtual reality puzzle game in which I manipulate large and mysterious objects in order to unlock secrets. You can watch a gameplay video above.

Developed by Vancouver-based Charm Games, it seeks to use the spatial freedom and scale of VR to create puzzles that require a bigger picture. While gaming puzzles generally take place inside a relatively small area, Form requires a more physical sense of looking and reaching.

Many of the early puzzles I played at a recent press event come down to fitting the right shape in the correct box, but I enjoyed the sense of bigness, most especially in the physical artifacts I handled. They have a solid feel about them.

The game follows a story of a Doctor Devin Eli, stranded on a remote lab complex. Eli has “superhuman powers of geometric visualization” which allow him to recognize shapes that other mortals cannot comprehend. When he discovers an ancient artifact he embarks on a journey into the depths of his own mind.

All this narrative dressing gives the designers of Form free reign to create esoteric puzzles to do with light, shapes and sequences. There’s a lot of grabbing things and turning them over to check where they might fit, which is just the sort of 3D logic that entrances children, and still has fascination for adults. The success of VR puzzles like Obduction, Fantastic Contraption and Floor Plan shows that there’s a great interest in physical and logical manipulation games.

Form is out later this year on Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, with a PlayStation VR version planned to follow.

Read more here:
Form is a VR puzzle game that’s all in the mind – Polygon


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