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The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Mr. White, Mr. Blue, Mr. Brown, and Mr. Pink are at a restaurant.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

What color shirt was each person wearing?

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle?

Or keep reading.

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Answer To The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle

Let’s analyze what each person states.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

Mr. Pink’s statement implies the shirt colors are white, blue, brown, and pink. So we can set up a logical grid as follows.

Furthermore, no one’s name matches the color of their shirt. This eliminates the diagonal entries in the grid.

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

The next statement implies Mr. Pink is not wearing a blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

Furthermore, Mr. Pink is not wearing a dark colored shirt, so Mr. Pink is also not wearing a brown shirt. By process of elimination, Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

This also means no one else is wearing a white shirt.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

We still have 3 people and 3 shirts to decide. Amazingly, this last statement allows us to solve the problem.

First, we can deduce that Mr. Brown is not wearing a blue shirt, as Mr. Brown dislikes his name and the person in the blue shirt was indifferent to what anyone’s name was. This means Mr. Brown must be wearing a pink shirt.

This implies no one else was wearing a pink shirt. Also, since the other 3 are not wearing the blue shirt, Mr. White must be wearing the blue shirt.

Thus, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt.

Thus we have the answer. Mr. White is wearing a blue shirt, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt, Mr. Brown is wearing a pink shirt, and Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

Source
This problem is a variation of Martin Gardner’s puzzle about dress colors
http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/2182228/ms-black-ms-blue-and-ms-green-is-there-really-a-unique-answer

See the original post:
The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central


Windows Central
Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10
Windows Central
In search of a Windows 10 puzzle game full of optical illusions to master? Kubic might fit the bill with over 60 geometric challenges. Available for Windows 10 PC and Mobile, Kubic delivers a host of mind-boggling puzzles inspired by M.C. Escher's art.

See original here:
Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central

Disney Interactive Launches New ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Puzzle Game App – The Kingdom Insider

Disney Interactive has announced a new puzzle game based on the live-action Beauty and the Beast.

Beauty and the Beast: Perfect Match is a match 3 game thats reminiscent of games like Bejeweled Blitz, or if youre truly oldschool, Columns for the Sega Genesis.

From the official website

The game is now available for download on iOS and Android devices.

You can learn more about Beauty and the Beast: Perfect Match on the official website.

Cant get enough of Beauty and the Beast? The live-action movie is coming to home video on June 6.

I’ve loved Disney as long as I can remember. As a former newspaper editor, web developer, and Disney comics freelancer, I’m able to combine that experience into writing about Disney online. I’m also the co-host of a Disney fan podcast called ‘Pirates & Princesses.’ Opinions mine.

See more here:
Disney Interactive Launches New ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Puzzle Game App – The Kingdom Insider

List of best puzzle games to challenge your brain – Gizbot

Published: Thursday, May 18, 2017, 9:03 [IST]

Puzzle games are one of the most interesting genres that have been evolved, finding new and different ways to test out brains. In fact, these puzzle games can be played easily on your mobile phones without demanding higher graphic card or processor.

Today, we have picked 5 puzzle games that you can try on your smartphone when you are bored or traveling.

Stay tuned to GizBot for more updates!

The classic 2048 puzzle is a fun, addictive and a very simple number puzzle game. Basically, you have to Swipe (Up, Down, Left, Right) to move the tiles. When two tiles with the same number touch, they merge into one. When 2048 tile is created, the player wins! The UI of the game is pretty simple and easy to use.

In this game, the user needs to help a tiny robot stumble home through 50 puzzling mechanical dioramas. The size of the game is too small and you can download it for free. Each one has a collectible card that you can get upon completion. It features a good graphic with some puzzle elements.

This game is more of a Chess, but with no rules at all. Unlike, Chess, this game is easy to play but it’s tough to get results that favor you (which is win). Further, this game demands your decision-making skills to finish off the game. The Checkers game hardly consume around 2MB of your mobile storage with decent graphics.

This calculative puzzle game comes with short time puzzle to kill your time during commutation, waiting for bus or train. It can be played by all age groups which helps in improving your mathematics as well as decision-making skills. In this game just you need to slide number blocks and like numbers in multiple of 3 will add up automatically.

Stay tuned to GizBot for more updates!

Continued here:
List of best puzzle games to challenge your brain – Gizbot

Puyo Puyo Tetris review: puzzle game titans are better together – The Sydney Morning Herald

Mashing the well-known, meticulous play of Tetris together with some other totally different puzzle game sounds like a recipe for disaster, but Sega’s Sonic Teamhas done just that and made Tetris the most enjoyable it’s been in years.

A party-ready puzzle game with heaps of modes and content to keep you busy, Puyo Puyo Tetris introduces Western gamers to an incredibly popular Japanese franchise, while also providing familiarity via its familiar block-fallingtwist.

For the unfamiliar, Puyo Puyo is an addictive, competitive game that challenges playersto match coloured balls of goo in order to clear the screen. Crafty combos send hard-to-remove garbage blocks to opponents, filling matches with tense risk/reward strategies. Outside of this core gameplay, the series is known for its quirky anime-style characters and odd-ball narrative, as well as its various alternative game modes.

While attempts were made to bring an English language version of the puzzle format to Sega and Nintendo platforms in the mid-nineties (disguised as Dr Robotnik’s Mean Bean Machine and Kirby’s Ghost Trap respectively), none of the main entries in the 25-year-old series have actually made it out of Japan.

Of course Tetris, by contrast, is verywell known in Australia and around the world, and this mash-up provides plenty of great ways to play that game alone or with up to three friends. But the real star of the show is the smart way the two games collide.

My favourite mode to play with friends, for example, is Swap. This has players switching between bothgames at timed intervals, testing their ability to manage both rule-sets and be the last one standing.

Also fun is the classic Versus mode, where each playeris free to choose whether they’ll compete by playing Tetris or Puyo Puyo. Against all odds, games do feel competitive and cohesive even though the players are playing totally different games, with the Puyo players building towards a massive waterfall of combos and the Tetris players meticulously trying to slot in that last block that will give them a five-line Tetris.

Of course to make the two games compatible with each other some flexibility is required, and the version of Tetris here isn’t exactly the same asyou may remember from your Game Boy. Fortunately, I think the game is largely improved thanks to its PuyoPuyo influences.

The biggest change is that removing multiple lines at once will send garbage tiles to your opponent, making the incentive to line up a five-linereven greater. Garbage lobbed at you from an opponent will appear as grey tiles at the bottom of your board that must be painstakingly removed lest they force you into a game over.

Many of the other modes, including Party and Fusion, mix the games more directly by having Tetrominos and Puyos appear together on the same game board. This can make for some hectic fun, but is a bit too messy to be as satisfying as the other game styles.

The most surprisingly full-featured mode is thePuyo-Puyo-style Adventure mode,which isfully voiced and introduces a new cast of characters from an alternative dimension whereTetris, notPuyoPuyo, is the world’s greatest obsession.

The story’s totally daft (as expected), but the characters and performances are charming. Each level sets up a challenge that players will be awarded between one and three stars for completing, so perfectionists will likely spend hours here.

Elsewhere the game even features a range of lessons to teach players the finer points of each game, and an online suite where you can take on the world.

This is certainly a Puyo Puyogame at heartwith chatty cartoon characters and fast-paced competitive fun prioritised over high scoresand analytical block-droppingbut Tetrisfans shouldn’t be too quick to dismiss it. After years of attempts to freshen upAlexeyPajitnov’s formula, with incredibly mixed results, this game delivers the most fun puzzle experience to bear the Tetris name in a very long time.

Puyo PuyoTetris is out now for Nintendo Switch (reviewed) and PlayStation 4.

Go here to see the original:
Puyo Puyo Tetris review: puzzle game titans are better together – The Sydney Morning Herald

Form is a VR puzzle game that’s all in the mind – Polygon

Form is a virtual reality puzzle game in which I manipulate large and mysterious objects in order to unlock secrets. You can watch a gameplay video above.

Developed by Vancouver-based Charm Games, it seeks to use the spatial freedom and scale of VR to create puzzles that require a bigger picture. While gaming puzzles generally take place inside a relatively small area, Form requires a more physical sense of looking and reaching.

Many of the early puzzles I played at a recent press event come down to fitting the right shape in the correct box, but I enjoyed the sense of bigness, most especially in the physical artifacts I handled. They have a solid feel about them.

The game follows a story of a Doctor Devin Eli, stranded on a remote lab complex. Eli has “superhuman powers of geometric visualization” which allow him to recognize shapes that other mortals cannot comprehend. When he discovers an ancient artifact he embarks on a journey into the depths of his own mind.

All this narrative dressing gives the designers of Form free reign to create esoteric puzzles to do with light, shapes and sequences. There’s a lot of grabbing things and turning them over to check where they might fit, which is just the sort of 3D logic that entrances children, and still has fascination for adults. The success of VR puzzles like Obduction, Fantastic Contraption and Floor Plan shows that there’s a great interest in physical and logical manipulation games.

Form is out later this year on Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, with a PlayStation VR version planned to follow.

Read more here:
Form is a VR puzzle game that’s all in the mind – Polygon

Can You Solve The 25 Horses Puzzle? Google Interview Question

Here is a problem that has been asked as an interview question.

There are 25 horses. What is the minimum number of races needed so you can identify the fastest 3 horses? You can race up to 5 horses at a time, but you do not have a watch.

As this question is a bit vague, here is a more precise version you can solve.

Interview Question (with more details)
There are 25 mechanical horses and a single racetrack. Each horse completes the track in a pre-programmed time, and the horses all have different finishing times, unknown to you. You can race 5 horses at a time. After a race is over, you get a printout with the order the horses finished, but not the finishing times of the horses. What is the minimum number of races you need to identify the fastest 3 horses?

I was suggested this problem by email from puzzle maker and speaker Terry Stickels.

This is also a classic interview question asked during programming interviews at tech companies like Google. It took me a good 10-15 minutes to figure it out. Can you figure it out? Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The 25 Horses Puzzle? Google Interview Question

Or keep reading.

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Answer To The 25 Horses Riddle

Here is how you can find the fastest 3 horses in 7 races.

Step one
Divide the 25 horses into groups of 5, and race the horses in each group. (5 races)

Step two
Take the winner from each group and race those 5 horses. The winner of this race is the fastest horse overall. (1 race)

Notation
Label the 5 groups from step one as a, b, c, d, e to correspond to horses finishing 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th in step two. Write a subscript to identify the order that the horse finished in the group, so a2 means the horse that finished 2nd place in group a.

Step three
Do one more race with horses a2, a3, b1, b2, c1. That is, race the second and third fastest from group a, the fastest and second fastest from group b, and the fastest from group c. The top 2 horses in this race are the 2nd and 3rd fastest horses overall. (1 race)

Why does this procedure work?

The logic of finding the fastest horse is straightforward. First the 25 horses are split into 5 groups. Any horse that loses a race cannot be the fastest overall. This eliminates 20 horses that finished in 2nd to 5th place.

Now the 5 winners race against each other. The horse that wins this race is faster than the other winners, and the other winners are faster than the other horses in their group. The fastest of the winners is therefore the fastest horse overall.

Now, how can we find the second and third fastest?

The fastest horse is denoted a1. There is no need to race this horse again as it is identified as the fastest overall. Which horses could be the 2nd or 3rd fastest overall?

We can first eliminate all horses from groups d and e as top 3 possibilities. This is because even the fastest horses in groups d and e are slower than the three horses a1, b1, and c1.

Similarly, we can eliminate every horse in group c that is slower than c1, as those horses raced slower than the three horses a1, b1, and c1.

Next we can eliminate a4 and a5, as they are slower than a1, a2, and a3. Finally we can eliminate b3, b4, and b5, as they are slower than a1, b1, and b2.

We are left with 5 possible horses to test: a2, a3, b1, b2, c1. We need to race these horses.

Here is a slightly different explanation of why these particular horses need to be raced again.

It might have been that all 3 fastest horses were in group a from the start. Thus, we have to race a2 and a3 once more.

Or it might have been that only the fastest horse was in group a, leaving the 2nd and 3rd fastest to be in group b. Thus we have to race b1 and b2 again.

Or maybe the fastest horse was in group a, the 2nd fastest was put in group b, and the third fastest was put in group c. This means c1 is a possibility too.

This leaves 5 horses that could be the second and third fastest horses. The horses we need to race again are then: a2, a3, b1, b2, c1.

The winner of this race is faster than every horse except for a1, so the winner is the 2nd fastest horse overall. The second place of this race is then the next fastest horse overall, so it is the 3rd fastest horse overall.

Here is another way of saying what was just explained. Imagine the 25 horses are numbered from 1 = fastest to 25 = slowest, but we do not know which groups the top 3 horses belong to. After the first six races, we know group a has the fastest horse numbered 1, which is faster than the quickest horse in b and then c. So there are four possibilities for where 1, 2, 3 could be:

–group a could have 1, 2, 3
–group a might only have 1,2 and group b would have 3
–group a might only have 1 and group b has 2, 3
–group a might have 1, group b has 2, and group c has 3

To distinguish between these possibilities, we need to compare the 2nd and 3rd horses from group a against the second horse from group b and the fastest horse in group c.

Proof of minimality

We have shown 7 races is a sufficient (maximum) number of races. Why is it is minimum?

To find the fastest, you need to run all 25 horses at least once, and since you can only race 5 horses at a time, you need a minimum of 25/5 = 5 races. Then you need to compare the winners of these races, which means a 6th race is necessary.

To find the second fastest, you need at least 1 more race to compare a2 and b1 (amongst other possible comparisons), meaning 7 races is a minimum value. As we have described how 7 races is sufficient, the described procedure is optimal.

Sources

I was suggested the problem via email from Terry Stickels. This is also a very popular problem. I came across the following websites during my research to write up the problem.

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-trickiest-riddle-you-have-been-given-or-have-given-out-at-a-job-interview/answer/Michael-Tan-6

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-minimum-number-of-races-necessary-to-determine-your-three-fastest-horses

http://www.programmerinterview.com/index.php/puzzles/25-horses-3-fastest-5-races-puzzle/

http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/744473/horse-race-question-how-to-find-the-3-fastest-horses

http://quiz.geeksforgeeks.org/puzzle-9-find-the-fastest-3-horses/

http://blog.dnickolas.com/2011/04/25-horses-5-lanes-no-clock-top-5-not-3.html

http://puzzles.nigelcoldwell.co.uk/fiftynine.htm

https://sites.google.com/site/idelerdennis/blog/25-horses-problem-palantir

http://www.mathgoespop.com/2012/05/run-for-the-ranking.html

http://durso.org/puzzles/horse.html

Read more from the original source:
Can You Solve The 25 Horses Puzzle? Google Interview Question

Snipperclips Nintendo Switch games review: Delightful puzzle game with no sharp edges – Express.co.uk

NINTENDO

The Nintendo Switch is starting to feel like the console that resurrected the lost art of local multiplayer.

Games like Mario Kart 8 Deluxe and Puyo Puyo Tetris feel like they were tailor made for Nintendo Switch, even though they’ve both appeared elsewhere.

Snipperclips is another game that benefits from Nintendo’s social approach to gaming, although here the focus is very much on teamwork and co-operation.

It’s not as frantic and thrilling as a race in Mario Kart, but the simple controls, colourful visuals and bite-sized stages make it the perfect game to play with a younger member of the family.

The aim of Snipperclips is to solve puzzles by cutting lead characters Snip and Clip into different shapes.

If you want to catch a basketball, for example, then the person controlling Snip will need to cut out a ball-sized bucket shape where Clip’s head used to be.

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But simply catching a ball would be too easy. Players must first summon the ball by cutting Snip’s body into a shape small enough to push a button on the opposite side of the room.

Then you’ve actually got to get the ball into the hoop without it dropping on the floor and having to start the whole process again.

What makes Snipperclips such a success is that even when you’ve figured out what to do, there’s no guarantee you’ll be able to it.

It’s a game that doesn’t just encourage communication, it actively requires it, and the shouting, bickering, trial and error soon leads to high-fives and fits of laughter.

Of course, you could just play Snipperclips by yourself, but really, where’s the fun in that? Thankfully, the versatility of the Nintendo Switch – the detachable Joy-Cons and kickstand – means that you really shouldn’t have to.

The only drawback is that Snipperclips is a bit short-lived and you could easily burn through the game’s 45 puzzles in one sitting.

Fortunately, there are a few extras that extend the action, including hockey and basketball modes for 2-4 players, as well as a party mode with a selection of madcap puzzles for more people.

There’s even a surprisingly hectic deathmatch mode in which players compete to be the last shape standing.

Snipperclips is a short-lived showcase of what makes the Nintendo Switch so successful. It’s a great fit for Nintendo’s new console, and a fantastic game for bringing people together.

More:
Snipperclips Nintendo Switch games review: Delightful puzzle game with no sharp edges – Express.co.uk

Eye In The Sky Is An Asymmetrical Co-Op VR Puzzle Game Now In Early Access – UploadVR

Im not sure which was the very first cooperative multiplayer video game, but it was certainly a fantastic addition to the medium. Some of my all-time favorite gaming memories involve someone either sitting by my side or talking to me through the internet while we enjoyed an adventure together. With the dawn of VR technology the possibilities for cooperative gaming are enormous.

Outside of traditional co-op games, like playing the latest Halo with a friend, is a sub-genre of games called asymmetrical multiplayer in which the players do not have access to the same type of experience. For example, in Evolve, one player controls a massive super-powered monster while the others play human soldiers set on taking down the beast. There have been a variety of asymmetrical VR games over the last year across all major headset platforms, many of which we listed here.

Eye in the Sky is the latest asymmetrical multiplayergame weve seen and it does something a bit differently. Instead of asking you to work against one another as you might do in Mass Exodus or most of the mini-games in Playroom VR, Eye in the Sky takes more inspirations from the Portal franchise. In this game you actually work with one another (one person in VR, the other outside of VR) to solve a variety of puzzles and try to escape multiple different rooms. Its much better than just watching someone else play a VR game.

Our main inspiration was the fact that we were frustrated with having to sit on the couch while our friends tried out our VR headsets, explainedAlex Terziev, Art Director atVinLia Games. My friends showed me this prototype they were working on and I immediately jumped on it as an opportunityYou can of course picture the influence that Portal had on us, as it has had its influence on all modern 3D puzzle games. But we wanted to take that a step further by playing around with the physicality of room sizes, room scale locomotion, and lighting. As for art style I got to push my own blend of late 70s and 80s sci-fi movie obsessions.

Eye in the Sky is currently available on Steam Early Access with official support for the HTC Vive at a price point of $14.99. Single player content is included as well, but the asymmetrical co-op levels are the real focus. What do you think of asymmetrical multiplayer games in VR? Let us know in the comments below!

Tagged with: Eye in the Sky

Read this article:
Eye In The Sky Is An Asymmetrical Co-Op VR Puzzle Game Now In Early Access – UploadVR

Tumbleseed Is an Ingenious Gameif You Can Manage Not to Die – WIRED

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Excerpt from:
Tumbleseed Is an Ingenious Gameif You Can Manage Not to Die – WIRED


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