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More Than Just Skin: How Hentai Games Are Seducing New Audiences – Forbes


Forbes
More Than Just Skin: How Hentai Games Are Seducing New Audiences
Forbes
While there's nothing wrong with visual novels [click-through interactive dramas], games that are actually fun to play are always welcome. Like HuniePopit's a really good puzzle game that encourages careful planning and foresight. The actual sex

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More Than Just Skin: How Hentai Games Are Seducing New Audiences – Forbes

Keystone Publishing pieces together a partnership with Devil’s Peek’s new puzzle game – VentureBeat

The pieces have fallen into place for KeystonePublishing, who announced a partnership withDevils Peek Games The Puzzleverse. Previously named ORB, The Puzzleverse is a 2D puzzler set in a nebular alternate dimension and will be released for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

This is a departure for Keystone, whose catalog thus far includes flight simulators such as Arctic Rescue and Discover Australia & New Zealand. Recently, itsbeen expanding by making inroads with indie developers, such as Pea Head Gamess Neon Sword and now Devils Peeks The Puzzleverse. Keystone has also been working on developing the game Homicide Detective, a globetrotting murder mystery that was developed with consultation from actual police investigators and homicide specialists.

Keystone isnt the only company looking to court indie developers. EA announcedEA Originals at last years E3 conference, its in-house label that seeks to foster and publish indie talent. Indies are also going to be increasingly availableon the Nintendo Switch.

Devils Peek is a one-man show run by Robert Anderson with occasional help on the soundtrack and video footage from a friend. Andersoncites Keystones publishing history as well as philanthropic efforts as the positives in the partnership. [Keystones team] are an incredible bunch of people who not only have huge publishing expertise but have a philanthropic mission to help children with their profits, Anderson said in a press release. This is Devils Peeks first game, and was greenlit on Steam Greenlight, a community where players can express interest in games still in early development.

The Puzzleverse features topdown gameplay and 12 unlockable abilities for the players character, an orb of lightthat solvespuzzles and collectsfragments of an otherworldlygalaxy in order to escape. According to the Steam Greenlight page, it was originally slated for release in the fourth quarter of 2018.

Read more here:
Keystone Publishing pieces together a partnership with Devil’s Peek’s new puzzle game – VentureBeat

The Loaded Dice Puzzle. And My Reaction to Power-Up, A New Book

A standard dice shows the number 6, and every number, with probability 1/6.

The dice is modified so the number 6 appears half as often as the other numbers. What probability of rolling a 6 on the new dice?

(Clarification per comment from blink: “half as often as each of the other numbers”)

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Loading A Dice Puzzle?

Or keep reading for the solution to the problem, and my reaction to a new book about math and video games.

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Answer To Loading A Dice Puzzle

One approach is to halve the original probability, so the new probability becomes Pr(roll 6) = (1/2)(1/6) = 1/12. But there is a problem if you do this. If we add up the probabilities of all the rolls, we fall short of 1:

1/12 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6 = 11/12

So we cannot simply adjust the probability in isolation, we have to adjust all the probabilities. But there is a way to adjust this guess to the correct one. The total probability is currently 11/12, and it needs to be increased to 1. We can do this by scaling by a factor of 12/11. Similarly, we can adjust each term by multiplying by a factor of 12/11.

This gives the new sum:

(12/11)(1/12 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/6) = (12/11)(11/12)

1/11 + 2/11 + 2/11 + 2/11 + 2/11 + 2/11 = 1

So we can see the probability of rolling a 6 is therefore 1/11.

There is another way to see the answer algebraically.

Method 2: algebra

Let p = Pr(roll 6). We want the other dice to show twice as frequently, so Pr(roll another number) = 2p. Now we need the total probability to be 1 for all rolls, so we have 1 term of p and 5 terms of 2p:

p + 2p + 2p + 2p + 2p + 2p = 1

11p = 1

p = 1/11

We arrive at the same answer. And there is another similar way you could have solved it too.

Method 3: odds

What are the odds of rolling a 6 versus any other number? It is 2:1 against rolling a 6, so the odds of rolling the numbers are 2:2:2:2:2:1 for the numbers 1 to 6.

To convert the odds to a probability, we add up the numbers to get:

2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 2 + 1 = 11

Now we take the relative odds divided by the total. Thus we again get the probability of rolling a 6 is equal to 1/11.

Power-Up by Matthew Lane

I came across this problem in Chapter 2 of Power-Up by Matthew Lane. I have previously linked to Matt’s work in several posts to his blog Math Goes Pop, where Matt explains difficult mathematical concepts using pop culture.

The book Power-Up uses video games as a background to discuss mathematical concepts. As someone that grew up playing video games, I really enjoyed the presentation which also includes many screen captures from games. Did you ever notice that the original Mario game for NES didn’t obey the conservation of momentum? And why exactly do popular shows like Jeopardy make for such bad video games? There is a mathematical reason that is quite fascinating!

Here is the book’s webpage where you can read more about it:
http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10954.html

Here is the book’s page on Amazon:
http://amzn.to/2oh7YK2

The book is suitable for gamers that want to learn a bit about math, and it’s also useful for teachers that are looking to make math more relevant to kids–because almost all kids in America are playing video games.

My reactions while reading

Chapter 1 sets up with a discussion of how some video games do and do not accurately model physics. It is really great to see screen captures of the games to illustrate the point, and you already get a flavor of how video games can be connected with deep mathematical concepts like time dilation.

I found chapter 2 to be one of the most interesting. Games and puzzles that are based on a fixed set of questions, like Jeopardy, are almost doomed to poor gameplay due to the nature of probability. This is a useful lesson for anyone that wants to design a product that depends on novelty.

Chapter 3 discusses the mathematics of voting, and even though I knew about many of the paradoxes, I was interested in the presentation and how voting can actually be improved to a better system.

Each subsequent chapter uses video games as a background to discuss mathematics, and there are some difficult topics covered like number theory and differential equations.

The final chapter discusses how video games can be important in math education. I did play a lot of video games as a kid and enjoyed learning about such connections as a way to motivate me to learn more math. Today 97% of kids in America play video games, so connecting math with video games has potential. In fact, one of earliest probability problems was about gambling and how to divide up stakes (see the puzzle First To 10 Points Wins).

So check out the book Power-Up. Disclosure: I did get a free copy of the book for review, and if you buy from the Amazon link I get a small percentage of the sale.

Here is the book’s webpage where you can read more about it:
http://press.princeton.edu/titles/10954.html

Here is the book’s page on Amazon:
http://amzn.to/2oh7YK2

Original post:
The Loaded Dice Puzzle. And My Reaction to Power-Up, A New Book

Puzzle video game – Wikipedia

Puzzle video games are a genre of video games that emphasize puzzle solving. The types of puzzles can test many problem-solving skills including logic, pattern recognition, sequence solving, and word completion. The player may have unlimited time or attempts to solve a puzzle, or there may be simple puzzles made difficult by having to complete them in real-time, as in Tetris.

Puzzle games focus on logical and conceptual challenges, although often the games add time-pressure or other action-elements. Although many action games and adventure games involve puzzles such as obtaining inaccessible objects, a true puzzle game focuses on puzzle solving as the primary gameplay activity.[1] Games usually involve shapes, colors, or symbols, and the player must directly or indirectly manipulate them into a specific pattern.[2]

Rather than presenting a random collection of puzzles to solve, puzzle games typically offer a series of related puzzles that are a variation on a single theme. This theme could involve pattern recognition, logic, or understanding a process. These games usually have a simple set of rules, where players manipulate game pieces on a grid, network or other interaction space. Players must unravel clues in order to achieve some victory condition, which will then allow them to advance to the next level. Completing each puzzle will usually lead to a more difficult challenge, although some games avoid exhausting the player by offering easier levels between more difficult ones.[1]

There is a large variety of puzzle games. Some feed to the player a random assortment of blocks or pieces that they must organize in the correct manner, such as Tetris, Klax and Lumines. Others present a preset game board or pieces and challenge the player to solve the puzzle by achieving a goal (Bomberman, The Incredible Machine).

Puzzle games are often easy to develop and adapt, being implemented on dedicated arcade units, home video game consoles, personal digital assistants, and mobile phones.

An action puzzle or arcade puzzle requires that the player manipulates game pieces in a real-time environment, often on a single screen and with a time limit, to solve the puzzle or clear the level.[3] This is a broad term that has been used to describe several subsets of puzzle game. Firstly, it includes falling-block puzzles such as Tetris and KLAX.[3] It includes games with characters moving through an environment, controlled either directly (Lode Runner) or indirectly (Lemmings).[4] This can cross-over with other action genres: a platform game which requires a novel mechanic to complete levels might be a “puzzle platformer”, such as manipulating time in Braid.[5] Finally, it includes other action games that require timing and accuracy with pattern-matching or logic skills, such as the first-person Portal.[6]

Other notable action puzzle games include Team Ico’s Ico and Shadow of the Colossus.

A hidden object game (sometimes called hidden picture) is a genre of puzzle video game in which the player must find items from a list that are hidden within a picture.[7] Hidden object games are a popular trend in casual gaming,[8][9] and are comparatively inexpensive to buy.[7][8] Time-limited trial versions of these games are usually available for download.

An early hidden object game was Alice: An Interactive Museum. Computer Gaming World reported in 1993 that “one disadvantage of searching through screen after screen for ‘switches’ is that after a while one develops a case of ‘clickitus’ of the fingers as one repeatedly punches that mouse button like a chicken pecking at a farmyard”.[10] Other early incarnations are the video game adaptations of the I Spy books published by Scholastic Corporation since 1997.

Publishers of hidden object games include Sandlot Games, Big Fish Games, Awem Studio, SpinTop Games, and Codeminion.[7] Examples of hidden object game series include Awakening, Antique Road Trip (both by Boomzap Entertainment), Dream Chronicles (PlayFirst), Mortimer Beckett (RealArcade/GameHouse), Mystery Trackers (by Elephant games), Hidden Expedition and Mystery Case Files (both by Big Fish Games).[11]

A reveal the picture game is a type of puzzle game that features piece-by-piece revealing of a photo or picture.

A physics game is a type of puzzle video game wherein the player must use the game’s physics to complete each puzzle. Physics games use realistic physics to make games more challenging.[12] The genre is especially popular in online flash games and mobile games. Educators have used these games to demonstrate principles of physics.[13]

Popular physics games include The Incredible Machine, World of Goo, Crayon Physics Deluxe, Angry Birds, Cut the Rope, Peggle, Portal, Portal 2, and Monster Strike.

In tile-matching video games, the player manipulates tiles in order to make them disappear according to a matching criterion. They include games of the “falling block” variety such as Tetris, games that require pieces to be swapped such as Bejeweled or Candy Crush Saga, and games in which are pieces are shot on the board such as Zuma. In many recent tile-matching games, the matching criterion is to place a given number of tiles of the same type so that they adjoin each other. That number is often three, and the corresponding subset of tile-matching games is referred to as “match-three games”.

There have also been many digital adaptations of traditional puzzle games, including solitaire and mahjong solitaire. Even familiar word puzzles, number puzzles, and association puzzles have been adapted as games such as Dr. Kawashima’s Brain Training.[14]

Puzzle video games owe their origins to brain teasers and puzzles throughout human history. Android Nim (TRS-80, 1979) is a computerized version of the mathematical strategy game Nim.[15] Other traditional, thinking games such as Hangman and Bulls and Cows (commercialized as Mastermind) were popular targets for computer implementation.

Atari’s 1978 Flag Capture for the Atari 2600 is a precursor of sorts to Minesweeper.[16]

Blockbuster by Alan Griesemer and Stephen Bradshaw (Atari 8-bit, 1981), is a computerized version of the Rubik’s Cube puzzle.[17]Snark Hunt (Atari 8-bit, 1982) is a single-player game of logical deduction,[18] a clone of the 1970s Black Box board game. Sokoban’s crate-pushing puzzles from 1982 have been widely cloned and its core mechanic incorporated into other games.

An early action game with puzzle elements is Konami’s Loco-Motion (1982), elements of which are seen in Pipe Mania from LucasArts (1989).

1984’s Puzzle Panic for the Atari 8-bit computers specifically uses the word puzzle in the game’s title. 1984 also saw the release of the action-puzzle game Boulder Dash, where the goal is to collect diamonds while avoiding or exploiting rocks that fall when the dirt beneath them is removed. It led to a number of clones categorized as “rocks and diamonds games.” In 1985, Chain Shot! introduced removing groups of the same color tiles on a grid.[19]Uncle Henry’s Nuclear Waste Dump (1986) has similarities to Tetris, though it was published prior to Tetris reaching the US, and the author claims he hadn’t seen it.[20]

Other early puzzle games include puzzle-platformers such as Door Door (1983),[21]Lode Runner (1983), and Doki Doki Penguin Land (1985).[22]

Tetris is credited for revolutionizing gaming and popularizing the puzzle genre. The game was created by Soviet game designer Alexey Pajitnov in 1985, who was inspired by a traditional puzzle game named Pentomino in which players arrange falling blocks into lines without any gaps. The game was a moderate success when released by Spectrum Holobyte for MS-DOS in 1987 and Atari Games in arcades in 1988, but it sold 30 million copies on the Game Boy alone.[2]

The 1990s saw the release of Lemmings.[23] The game involves a series of creatures who mindlessly walk into deadly situations, and the player assigns jobs to specific lemmings to guide the swarm to a safe destination.[2]

1994 was marked by a surge in interest in mahjong video games from Japan.[24][25]

When Minesweeper was released with Windows 95, mainstream audiences embraced using a mouse to play puzzle games.[26]

In 2001, PopCap Games released a graphically-enhanced clone of an obscure 1994 MS-DOS game, Shariki,[27] where the player must touch groups of three or more jewels on a grid, causing them to disappear and new stones to fall into place. A decade later, the match three mechanic was the foundation for popular games, including Candy Crush Saga and Puzzle & Dragons, both from 2012.

Read the original:
Puzzle video game – Wikipedia

‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – Washington Post

By Christopher Byrd By Christopher Byrd May 26

Rime Developed by: Tequila Softworks Published by: Grey Box Available on: Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One

Rime is a game about the acceptance of loss. In a 2014 interview with Polygon, Ral Rubio Munrriz, the games creative director, recalled how the idea for the game came to him while he was drowning in the Mediterranean Sea. (According to the Spanish game developer, he swam out to a buoy and was seized by a panic attack, which left his future brother-in-law to save him.) Like many who report having a near-death experience, it brought Rubio clarity. For us as creators we have reached the end of an era of shooting and explosions which was all great, but now we are starting to question ourselves in the world, he said in 2014. And, in an interview this month with Gamesindustrybiz he said: Thats why you have games like That Dragon, Cancer or Papers, Please, because theyre not trying to entertain you and thats one step above Hollywood cinema. Were trying to transmit you a personal message.

The first few scenes in Rime convey three essential aspects of nature: its mystery, danger, and beauty. The opening shot is of a star-encrusted sky. Then the camera lowers to reveal grey, storm-lit clouds above a violent sea. A scrap of red cloth flies in front of the camera before the scene fades to white and transitions to a blue sky. A broken marble tower comes into view that overlooks tree-dotted cliffs and a pristine beach on which lies the solitary figure of a young boy. Enu is dressed in a tunic, like a boy in a picture book about ancient Greece, and what appears to be a torn red cape. With effort he lifts himself to his feet.

As Enu, players explore the beautifully realized island. Swim a bit beyond the shore in the beginning of the game and youll see an unidentifiable person wrapped in a red cloak standing on a high rock jutting out of the water. The mysterious figure acts as a through-line for the game which contains no dialogue. Rather, the emotional texture of Rimes bare bones plot is primarily conveyed through incidents and environmental details. Ascend a gleaming marble staircase, for instance, and you might notice murals on either side one of a distressed man with a crown on his head, and another of a boy in a red cape cradling his head in his hands.

Though it lacks hack-and-slash combat, Rime is a puzzle-adventure game similar to Zelda. I delighted in how the games puzzles built on each other. Aside from acting as mere gateways between areas, a number of the puzzles immerse the player in the games aesthetics. There are puzzles that manipulate time, so that one can scroll through the games day-night cycle and revel in its fantastic evocation of Mediterranean light. Rime also signals its artistic values via puzzles that require you to place things on pedestals. Although there were numerous times I had to step away from the game to gain a fresh perspective on a puzzle, I almost invariably found that when I returned to it, I was able to swiftly grasp the solution a rhythm I value in puzzle games.

The most perilous parts of Enus journey rarely got my pulse up, and I dont mean that as a put-down. There is a tranquility to Rime reminiscent of Fumito Uedas games. Clearly, the developers went all in on developing an eye-catching art style, abstract yet sensible puzzles and intricately designed environments. Although the central plot arc can be summed up in a sentence (I wont because I dont want to spoil it for you), its the experience of the game that counts. The gradations of colors in Rimes green-blue sea or in its bluish-purple nighttime sky are more expressive than in some other video games. At its core, Rime, is really nothing more and nothing less than an opportunity to roam around a beautiful environment and work through its strange logic.

Christopher Byrd is a Brooklyn-based writer who has been playing video games since the days of the Atari 2600. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Barnes & Noble Review, Al Jazeera America, the Guardian and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter@Chris_Byrd.

Recentgame reviews:

Farpoint: A reason to dust off that VR headset you got for Christmas

Little Nightmares: Well-paced, fairy-tale like and very dark

Pinstripe An Adventure Through Hell is an indie game funded by Kickstarter and worth your attention

Mario Kart 8 Deluxe is a not-quite successful marriage of an old favorite and a new platform

See original here:
‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – Washington Post

‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – SFGate

Christopher Byrd, The Washington Post

Photo: Courtesy Of Grey Box.

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss.

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss.

‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure

Rime

Developed by: Tequila Softworks

Published by: Grey Box

Available on: Nintendo Switch, PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One

“Rime” is a game about the acceptance of loss. In a 2014 interview with Polygon, Ral Rubio Munrriz, the game’s creative director, recalled how the idea for the game came to him while he was drowning in the Mediterranean Sea. (According to the Spanish game developer, he swam out to a buoy and was seized by a panic attack, which left his future brother-in-law to save him.) Like many who report having a near-death experience, it brought Rubio clarity. “For us as creators we have reached the end of an era of shooting and explosions which was all great, but now we are starting to question ourselves in the world,” he said in 2014. And, in an interview this month with Gamesindustrybiz he said: “That’s why you have games like ‘That Dragon, Cancer’ or ‘Papers, Please,’ because they’re not trying to entertain you and that’s one step above Hollywood cinema. We’re trying to transmit you a . . . personal message.”

The first few scenes in “Rime” convey three essential aspects of nature: its mystery, danger, and beauty. The opening shot is of a star-encrusted sky. Then the camera lowers to reveal grey, storm-lit clouds above a violent sea. A scrap of red cloth flies in front of the camera before the scene fades to white and transitions to a blue sky. A broken marble tower comes into view that overlooks tree-dotted cliffs and a pristine beach on which lies the solitary figure of a young boy. Enu is dressed in a tunic, like a boy in a picture book about ancient Greece, and what appears to be a torn red cape. With effort he lifts himself to his feet.

As Enu, players explore the beautifully realized island. Swim a bit beyond the shore in the beginning of the game and you’ll see an unidentifiable person wrapped in a red cloak standing on a high rock jutting out of the water. The mysterious figure acts as a through-line for the game which contains no dialogue. Rather, the emotional texture of “Rime’s” bare bones plot is primarily conveyed through incidents and environmental details. Ascend a gleaming marble staircase, for instance, and you might notice murals on either side – one of a distressed man with a crown on his head, and another of a boy in a red cape cradling his head in his hands.

Though it lacks hack-and-slash combat, “Rime” is a puzzle-adventure game similar to “Zelda.” I delighted in how the game’s puzzles built on each other. Aside from acting as mere gateways between areas, a number of the puzzles immerse the player in the game’s aesthetics. There are puzzles that manipulate time, so that one can scroll through the game’s day-night cycle and revel in its fantastic evocation of Mediterranean light. “Rime” also signals its artistic values via puzzles that require you to place things on pedestals. Although there were numerous times I had to step away from the game to gain a fresh perspective on a puzzle, I almost invariably found that when I returned to it, I was able to swiftly grasp the solution – a rhythm I value in puzzle games.

The most perilous parts of Enu’s journey rarely got my pulse up, and I don’t mean that as a put-down. There is a tranquility to “Rime” reminiscent of Fumito Ueda’s games. Clearly, the developers went all in on developing an eye-catching art style, abstract yet sensible puzzles and intricately designed environments. Although the central plot arc can be summed up in a sentence (I won’t because I don’t want to spoil it for you), it’s the experience of the game that counts. The gradations of colors in “Rime’s” green-blue sea or in its bluish-purple nighttime sky are more expressive than in some other video games. At its core, “Rime,” is really nothing more and nothing less than an opportunity to roam around a beautiful environment and work through its strange logic.

– – –

Byrd is a Brooklyn-based writer who has been playing video games since the days of the Atari 2600. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Barnes & Noble Review, Al Jazeera America, the Guardian and elsewhere. Follow him on Twitter @Chris_Byrd.

See the rest here:
‘Rime’ is an eye-catching, ‘Zelda’-like puzzle-adventure – SFGate

Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets’ brains in gear – Sacramento Bee

Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets' brains in gear
Sacramento Bee
Is there anything more fun than watching a pet play? Whether the game is fetching a ball, tugging on a rope toy, killing a soft toy, wrestling with a pal or working to solve a puzzle toy, it's fascinating to see how play mimics key real-life

Link:
Puzzle toys enhance play and put pets’ brains in gear – Sacramento Bee

‘Rime’ review – Digital Trends

Some of the most interesting indie games of the last few years have focused on channeling the emotional power of interactive storytelling. Where AAA games have focused on recapturing the nostalgia of games from 30 years ago, or trying to squeeze the most jump scares into 20 minutes, games like What Remains of Edith Finch, Abzu, Journey and Insidehave used the language of video games running, jumping, sliding, fighting to deliver very particular feelings.

Tequila Works Rime draws much of its inspiration from that well. On the surface, Rime is an action-adventure puzzle game, with climbing and running and pushing boxes into their correct positions to open doors. What its trying to deliver, though, is a specific set of feelings mostly captured in art direction and music.

Explaining the exact feelings and emotions Rime hopes to instill in you would take away from its journey across a gorgeous island, over a sun-bleached desert, and through a shadowy, rain-drenched necropolis. The emotional themes of the games five main areas arent clear until you complete the game and see the whole picture.

But Rimes dedication to those themes, and its careful deployment of beautiful imagery and swelling music, is just enough to make a fun, mostly pleasant puzzle title stand out from the crowd.

The surface-level premise of Rime finds a shipwrecked child stranded on a Mediterranean-esque island, trying to figure out what to do about the situation. Not far from where they awaken is a gleaming white tower surrounded by ruins and statues. A friendly, strangely magical fox appears to lead them to the tower, and with no prompting or dialogue at all, its off to solve puzzles to find the way forward.

That part of the game the actual puzzle-solving is competent and enjoyable, but ultimately pretty lightweight. To Rimes credit, the game simply throws puzzle after puzzle at you Theres no explanation given, and none necessary. The first one, for instance, brings the child into a large open space with four strange statues surrounding a fifth larger one. What needs to be done isnt immediately clear, but look around and pillars of green light reaching into the sky will attract your attention. Wander off to find out what they are, and youre soon climbing Uncharted-style until you reach the lights, which are actually produced by more statutes, colored in jade.

Each green statue is clearly important, but what to do with them? A quick expeRimental round of button presses and you discover that one makes the child shout. Their wordless voice carries some kind of power to activate the statues, sending a green spirit flittering back toward the five original statues. With one cleared, its off to find the others and surmount their challenges like a path blocked by brambles thats cleared by tossing fruit to lure a warthog to barrel through, or using special orbs to amplify the childs voice and make it carry further.

These lighter puzzles work here, as they do in games like Inside, because the world carries them.

Puzzle design in Rime is smart and tight, but also not especially demanding. Youll almost always instantly understand what the game wants of you as soon as you look around a room. If you dont, momentary trial and error, or maybe more accurately, following the only open path, will make the next step obvious.

These lighter puzzles work here, as they do in games like Inside, because the world carries them. In some of the games chapters, the puzzles meld with the games unfolding, wordless narrative in a way that makes both feel like essential parts of the experience.

At the same time, the high points also illuminate the fact that many of the puzzles arent engrossing in their own right. While it is great that everything is tightly built, the puzzles sometimes unravel too easily. Youll never have to take a step back and try to view the game in a new light, because almost every solution will be clear at first glance. When you can intuit the answer to a problem almost immediately, it makes actually going through the motions of solving it feel like exactly that: Going through the motions.

Its what Rime does in between puzzles, and what it says through visuals and music and never with dialogue, that makes it interesting, though. Sweeping camera angles show off ruined towers and crashing waves in one chapter, and pan to capture a huge pterodactyl-looking bird swooping down to snag the child in its clutches in another.

Rimes moment-to-moment play feels like Journey in that mix of interactivity, beautiful vistas, and rising orchestra. Rime is about the place youre in and how it feels to be there, more than the video game elements of constantly clearing tasks. Riffing on that same Journey feel are the few characters you meet along the way, like the fox, some strange, shadowy creatures that often flee if you get too close to them, and giant two-legged robots, one of whom follows you around opening doors for a chapter.

That part of the experience works well. The slowly unfolding story of the shipwreck, of the child, and where they find themself is enough to carry the game forward, as is the mystery of the symbolism presented in each chapter. Tequila Works does a great job on presentation in Rime, and coupled with solid gameplay throughout, its a compelling experience.

The game might even work better with a second playthrough, once the games ending has had a chance to recontextualize what players have seen up to that point, in order to better track the symbolism and artistic choices made throughout Rimes earlier levels. This might serve as a strike against it, if not for the fact that Rime can be picked up and completed in a few scant hours it took me between three and four, although I was only making a cursory attempt at finding the games many collectibles, some of which expand on the story and slightly alter the endgame.

Rime is one of those game experiences that takes the traditional elements of a video game, and wields them as a tool for evoking emotion and delivering metaphor. Its a noble ambition that can push the medium forward, and Rime achieves a lot with its art direction, its music, and the strange and interesting world it weaves. All the moving parts of the game might not add up perfectly, but Rime certainly conjures a world thats worth a wander.

Is there a better alternative?

Rime falls in line with narrative-driven puzzle games, such as Limbo, Inside, Journey, and The Unfinished Swan. Players drawn to those games will enjoy this as well, as it does some smart things with its gameplay and presentation to stand among the ranks of similar titles.

How long will it last?

Our playthrough lasted somewhere between three and four hours, but your play-time may vary depending on how much time you spend exploring the games world, and how easily you adapt to the games puzzles. If you uncover every secret, and explore every place, the game could last six hours or more.

Plus, as we mentioned in the review, the game almost begs for a second playthrough.

Should you buy it?

Yes, especially if youre looking for short, refreshing change of pace between giant AAA games.

See the article here:
‘Rime’ review – Digital Trends

The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Mr. White, Mr. Blue, Mr. Brown, and Mr. Pink are at a restaurant.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

What color shirt was each person wearing?

Watch the video for a solution.

Can You Solve The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle?

Or keep reading.

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Answer To The Four Color Codes Logic Puzzle

Let’s analyze what each person states.

Mr. Pink said, “I can’t believe it. The boss gave us names that matched our shirt colors, but no one got the same name as their own shirt color. My name is terrible.”

Mr. Pink’s statement implies the shirt colors are white, blue, brown, and pink. So we can set up a logical grid as follows.

Furthermore, no one’s name matches the color of their shirt. This eliminates the diagonal entries in the grid.

“Who cares what anyone’s name is?” said the person in the blue shirt.

The next statement implies Mr. Pink is not wearing a blue shirt.

“Yeah, that’s easy for you to say. You have a cool sounding name. Maybe if the cleaners hadn’t messed up my dark colored shirts I could have worn a different shirt and gotten a better name,” Mr. Pink replied.

Furthermore, Mr. Pink is not wearing a dark colored shirt, so Mr. Pink is also not wearing a brown shirt. By process of elimination, Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

This also means no one else is wearing a white shirt.

“Yeah, I don’t like my name either,” said Mr. Brown.

We still have 3 people and 3 shirts to decide. Amazingly, this last statement allows us to solve the problem.

First, we can deduce that Mr. Brown is not wearing a blue shirt, as Mr. Brown dislikes his name and the person in the blue shirt was indifferent to what anyone’s name was. This means Mr. Brown must be wearing a pink shirt.

This implies no one else was wearing a pink shirt. Also, since the other 3 are not wearing the blue shirt, Mr. White must be wearing the blue shirt.

Thus, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt.

Thus we have the answer. Mr. White is wearing a blue shirt, Mr. Blue is wearing a brown shirt, Mr. Brown is wearing a pink shirt, and Mr. Pink is wearing a white shirt.

Source
This problem is a variation of Martin Gardner’s puzzle about dress colors
http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/2182228/ms-black-ms-blue-and-ms-green-is-there-really-a-unique-answer

See the original post:
The Four Color Codes Logic Problem, Sunday Puzzle

Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central


Windows Central
Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10
Windows Central
In search of a Windows 10 puzzle game full of optical illusions to master? Kubic might fit the bill with over 60 geometric challenges. Available for Windows 10 PC and Mobile, Kubic delivers a host of mind-boggling puzzles inspired by M.C. Escher's art.

See original here:
Kubic, a mind-boggling Escher-inspired puzzler for Windows 10 – Windows Central


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