Page 4«..3456..1020..»

‘Tiny Bubbles’ Is a Puzzle Game That’s Way More in Depth Than We Were Expecting at PAX – Touch Arcade

We first posted about Tiny Bubbles early last month, and I think it was easy to be skeptical about the game, particularly on mobile where it feels like there’s every iteration of color matching games has been explored ten times over. Well, after watching a demo of the many different puzzle types found in Tiny Bubbles, I found myself blown away with the level of depth such a seemingly simple color matching and bubble popping game has. Check out our video:

Considering the number of awards Tiny Bubbles has won, it’s not much of a surprise that it turned out this way. It really seems like the game has a winning combination of a clever physics mechanic, color mixing (and matching), and challenges that grow over time as each new set of puzzles throws more twists your way. Tiny Bubbles definitely went from a game that originally I was like, “Oh cool, a matching game” to one of the titles from PAX I’m most excited to play when it finally comes out.

Definitely a pleasant surprise.

More:
‘Tiny Bubbles’ Is a Puzzle Game That’s Way More in Depth Than We Were Expecting at PAX – Touch Arcade

Review: The Bridge – Nintendo Life

Puzzle games by their very nature are designed to deceive and delight. Regardless of console or dimension, a good puzzle game has to strike a perfect balance between challenge and attainability.

From making lines to jumping through walls, lateral thinking, logic and reflexes have been put to the test for gamers everywhere, and there’s a universal appeal to puzzle games that have frustrated and intrigued generations for years. Art vs Science.

The Bridge is the byproduct of a computer science project from American two man team Ty Taylor and Mario Castaeda, and it’s the bringing together of such a striking, hand drawn art style with gravity and perspective-based conundrums that is the main hook of the game. As an ambiguous and bearded figure, you navigate a series of hand drawn lithographic dioramas that challenge perception, progressive thinking and defy the laws of physics.

Recreating an iconic moment in scientific history, players are introduced to a few of the game’s key mechanics in a cute mini tutorial. Using the right and left trigger tilts the world, while the left stick moves the character. It isn’t long before the penny (or apple) drops and you are either sliding down or labouring uphill towards the game’s central hub.

Presenting 3D shapes and architecture in a 2d space reminiscent of the work of artist MC Escher, The Bridge requires a skewed angle of perspective and an articulated thought process to solve its 48 levels, split between several chapters located throughout an isolated yet increasingly expansive farm cottage.

From a permanently fixed viewpiont, your task is to navigate your way through a series of increasingly mind bending dioramas consisting of a door, a key, and a few other obstacles. The objective of The Bridge’s puzzles is to use a combination of rotation and character movement to tilt, drop and spin yourself and other objects to reach the exit. Switches alter gravity or the colour of our protagonist, floors become ceilings, and sinister ‘menace balls’ can be both an advisory and ally. The most difficult of areas can seem intimidating – with multiple switches and hazards interwoven into intricate and layered labyrinths.

Luckily the puzzles aren’t too reliant on any sense of urgency or quick reflexes. Sure, it is possible to try and succeed by constantly using the ‘rewind’ feature (holding B at any point) to play back your movements (indebted to indie hit platformer Braid), and this will prove useful in experimentation in order to progress, but there is a real sense of satisfaction when the moves are executed in order andeverything falls (flips or rises) into place.

Upon understanding the game’s various physics-based rules, it rewards planning and observation rather than the frustration that comes with trial and error. The difficulty does spike in a few puzzles; while features such as veils mayinitially seem confusing in their function and vortexes serve as booby traps, further investigation demonstrates their integral role in solving puzzles that initially appear impossible, and after an extended play session there can be a sense not so much of a euphoric epiphany, but more of dogged triumph.

The Bridge is ultimately an enchanting and rewarding experience thanks to its beautiful handdrawn art style. While it would be slightly unfair to call the game bleak, there is a sense of melancholy and insular contemplation woven into the journey of the main character and his manipulation of literal and psychological space. The character is drawn at the start of each stage, the world flickers and everything moves as if it were an old black and white animation. Although the story is mostly a series of text boxes philosophizing the nature of existence and never really reaches its emotionalpotential, the mood andworld created are constantly enthralling.

Despite being previously available on various home and portable consoles, both in handheld and docked mode the Switch version of The Bridge’s presentation and aesthetic instantly captivates. The scratches and metallic sound effects add atmosphere, but its soundtrack is nevertheless limited and – although fittingly low key and ambient – becomes repetitive.

In an attempt to not make any particular scenario outstay its welcome, or any idea become stale, the game ironically comes across as a little lacking regarding a fleshed out narrative or steady learning curve. Each new twist or setting is introduced, utilised sparingly, then it’s onto the next.

With the lack of analogue controls, the rotation of the dioramas themselves (and moving the player for that matter) also feels slightly sluggish, especially when attempting to manipulate multiple objects at once. In addition the loading times are awkwardly noticeable; to some this might be forgivable, but nonetheless they slow the pace and interrupt the flow.

An endearing combination of influences from art and science makes The Bridge a valuable addition to the Nintendo Switch library, especially if you’ve never played it before.

Sometimes bogged down by showing off its aesthetic strengths at the sacrifice of fully exploring the puzzle ideas and mechanics, The Bridge does suffer slightly due to slow controls and a story/ character that deserves a little more nuance to back up its ambitious and academic influences. What it does do, however, is reward players’ patience, calculation and observation with moments that rival some of the best in the genre.

A genuinely interesting and challenging experience that, despite a few small flaws, will stretch mental as well as physical muscles.

Read more from the original source:
Review: The Bridge – Nintendo Life

Pax West 2017 The Gardens Between – DVS Gaming (registration) (blog)

From indie developer The Voxel Agents comes The Gardens Between, whichwill draw in new players with its enchanting soundtrack and vibrant, lush environment.

The Gardens Between is a surreal puzzle adventure that follows best friends, Arina and Frendt, as they fall into a mysterious world of beautiful garden islands. The player can traverse back and forwards in time to discover each gardens secrets and, along the way, reveal a story about friendship, childhood and growing up. Watch the entrancing trailer here

The Gardens Between will embark on a thought provoking and emotional journey, said Simon Joslin, co-founder, The Voxel Agents.

Puzzle games allow the player to use parts of their mind that they do not typically use on a daily basis which is very useful in maintaining healthy cognitive behaviors.

About The Voxel Agents

Headquartered in Melbourne, Australia, The Voxel Agents are an indie game developer that was founded in 2009 by Simon Joslin, Matthew Clark, and Tom Killen to create games that kindle curiosity with a passion for highly focused gameplay.

Previous achievements include their hitreleaseTrain Conductor, followed byTrain Conductor 2 USAandPuzzle Retreat, totaling over 7 million global players for The TrainConductorfranchise.

The game is expected to release early 2018 and can be acquired on Steam here.

Let us knowin the comments below and join us onDiscord, on ourFacebook page, orTwitter.

Post Views: 17

Read the original:
Pax West 2017 The Gardens Between – DVS Gaming (registration) (blog)

Capcom is finally releasing a new Puzzle Fighter game, and it’s coming to Android later this year – Android Police

It would appear that Capcom has been listening to its most die-hard fans as it’s finally bringing us a new game in the Puzzle Fighter series. Capcom Vancouver is developing it, and it’s going to be a mobile only release. If you’re worried about a western studio developing what was originally a very Japanese looking and feeling game, or the fact that this is strictly a mobile only release, well, I am sad to say that your fears are warranted.

First off I would like to point out that I’m a huge fan ofSuper Puzzle Fighter II Turbo and its subsequent HD remix. I’ve been saying for years that a new game in the Puzzle Fighter series would be perfect for mobile. But of course, my largest concern was that Capcom would take the tried and true gameplay of this puzzle battler and ruin it by inserting a slew of free-to-play mechanics. Sadly it would appear that my worst fear has come true.

If you take a look at the trailer above, you’ll clearly see two types of currencies being used in the game. One is coins, and the other is gems. You will also see cards being used to represent each of the game’s characters, where each card is marked with the text “LVL 1.” So not only will you be collecting these fighters as cards in order to build your team, but it appears that you will be leveling up these cards as well. Then, in another segment of the video, you’ll see that there’s a clear loot crate system where you unlock new heroes and coins. Immediately after that, it’s revealed you can also unlock new costumes for your fighters.

When you consider all at once the two currencies, hero card collection and leveling, loot crates, and unlockable outfits, the picture starts to become pretty clear that this is not going to be a traditional Puzzle Fighter title. Instead, we’re getting an amalgamation of Puzzle Fighter gameplay mixed heavily with umpteen easily recognizable free-to-playmechanics.

And even if you ignore the fact that this release is going to be yet another lame free-to-play title, the art direction leaves quite a lot of questions in and of itself. First and foremost, what in the hell were the artists thinking? The 2D pixel art found in the original and HD remix would have been perfect for this mobile game. But frankly, I don’t know what to make of these weird westernized chibi looking 3d designs. The game obviously has a very odd look that doesn’t mesh with the precedent already set by earlier titles in the series.

Short of what can be gleaned from the trailer, details are still light. What is known is that this will be a multiplayer title with real-time battles where you compete for the top spot on its leaderboard. Single player content is also included, which is good news for those that don’t want to compete with real people head-to-head. A soft launch is expected sometime soon with an official release before the end of the year. Oh, and unlike the original game that only had characters from the Street Fighter and Darkstalkers franchises, this new mobile version will have a wide selection of Capcom characters includingRyu, Ken, and Chun-Li fromStreet Fighter, X from theMega Manseries, Morrigan ofDarkstalkersfame, and Frank West and Chuck Greene from theDead Risinggames.

So it would appear this release is going to be at best a mixed bag. The art is, in my opinion, atrocious and the free-to-play mechanics are most definitely going to ruin any kind of ranked competitive multiplayer gameplay. But the expanded roster of characters and the fact that we will finally have an online multiplayer Puzzle Fighter on Android still gives me a feeling of excitement, albeit a tiny one. I hope that Capcom Vancouver can come up with something that’s still fun to play despite how it’s monetized, but seeing that the release isn’t that far off, let’s just say that this hope is probably wasted on what will inevitably be the ruination of a once great game.

View post:
Capcom is finally releasing a new Puzzle Fighter game, and it’s coming to Android later this year – Android Police

Can you solve it? Riddles inspired by card tricks – The Guardian

Ladies and gentlemen,

Today, three magic tricks. I mean three riddles.

Chess Boxing

A hustler and a chess grandmaster are playing the following game. All the pieces from a chess set are in a box. The two participants take turns reaching into the box without looking, picking out two pieces at a time and placing them onto the table. If the two pieces are white, the grandmaster gets a point. If the two pieces are black, the hustler gets a point. If the colours dont match, no one gets a point. They will take turns removing pairs until the box is empty. If, exactly halfway through the game, the score is 4-2 in favour of the grandmaster, who will ultimately win the game and by how many points?

Tunnel Traffic

A boulder falls onto a mountain road, temporarily blocking access to a tunnel. A few drivers get out of their cars to help move the boulder. After they successfully clear the entrance to the tunnel, they notice some unusual traffic has accumulated on the two-lane road behind them. The traffic jam consists of eighteen white cars and eighteen black cars. The first car in the left lane is white and the first car in the right lane is black. The colours of the cars behind them in each lane alternate perfectly.

When passing through the narrow tunnel, the two lanes of traffic merge into one, and when they come out the other side the single lane branches to two toll booths. Assuming that the first car through the tunnel is a black car and the last car through is a white car, and that the cars reach the toll booth in pairs meaning that the first two cars exit together, then the next two exit together, and so on what is the greatest possible number of exiting pairs that will match in colour?

Family Bike Race

At the Froome family reunion, five sets of twins from five different generations decide to have a bike race, with two teams and one sibling from each set of twins on each team. Each team sets off with all five cyclists in a line behind their captain. At any point in the race, the last person in the line can cycle to the front of the line to become the new captain. All five team members must cross the finish line to complete the race.

Both teams line up in age order but Team A starts the race with a little kid as their captain and Team B starts the race with an elderly woman as their captain. During the course of the race, the captains change six times between the two teams. When the teams cross the finish line, what are the odds that their captains will be the same age?

You may have noticed that each of these riddles involve two different kinds of the same thing: black chess pieces and white chess pieces, black and white cars, members of Team A and members of Team B. Thats because the mathematical principles behind the riddles are taken from card tricks, in which cards are either black or red. With a bit of thought, you can probably figure out just how the tricks work. Compared to the usual level in this column, todays puzzles are relatively easy, but the mathematical patterns they reveal are interesting, satisfying and surprising, which is why magicians have plundered them.

The puzzles were devised by this columns favourite cardsharp, Adam Rubin, who works with many internationally-known magicians. He is also Director of Puzzles and Games for the site Art of Play, on which you can buy beautiful playing cards.

Ill be back with the answers at 5pm UK time. UPDATE: The solutions are now up here.

NO SPOILERS. Please converse about cards.

My latest book is out this week! Football School Season 2 is the follow-up to Football School, a book series aimed at 7-12-year-olds which TalkSPORT called a Horrible Histories for football. The new book explains why every stadium has a vomitory, the physics of why footballs are NOT round and which international goalkeeper used to pee on the pitch before penalty shoot-outs. As well as lots of maths, English, history, geography and more. The perfect gift for a football-mad boy or girl! More info at footballschool.co.

I set a puzzle here every two weeks on a Monday. Send me your email if you want me to alert you each time I post a new one. Im always on the look-out for great puzzles. If you would like to suggest one, email me.

Read more:
Can you solve it? Riddles inspired by card tricks – The Guardian

Challenge to end stalemate over $1 million maths puzzle – The Courier

Computer programmers are being offered a $1 million prize for inventing a system to crack a simple chess puzzle.

The eight queens puzzle, which has been solved by humans on a regular chess board, sends computer programmes into meltdown.

A team of St Andrews academics concluded that devising a computer programme to solve the problem could reap immense rewards.

In a paper published in the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, Professsor Ian Gent from the universitys school of computer science said it could be the key to tightening up internet security.

If you could write a computer programme that could solve the problem really fast, you could adapt it to solve many of the most important problems that affect us all daily, he said.

This includes trivial challenges like working out the largest group of your Facebook friends who dont know each other, or very important ones like cracking the codes that keep all our online transactions safe.

The Clay Mathematics Institute in America has offered a $1 million reward for whoever solves a similar conundrum called the P vs NP Problem.

Professor Gent and his colleagues, Dr Peter Nightingale and Dr Christopher Jefferson, first became intrigued by the puzzle after a friend challenged Professor Gent to solve it on Facebook.

The team found that when the chess board reached 1000 squares by 1000, computer programmes could no longer cope with the vast number of options and sunk into a potentially eternal struggle akin to the fictional super computer Deep Thought in Douglas Adams Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, which took seven and a half million years to provide an answer to the meaning of everything.

Dr Nightingale said: In practice, nobody has ever come close to writing a programme that can solve the problem quickly.

So what our research has shown is that, for all practical purposes, it cant be done.

Dr Jefferson added: There is a $1m prize for anyone who can prove whether or not the queens puzzle can be solved quickly so the rewards are high.

Devised in 1850, the queens puzzle originally challenged a player to place eight queens on a standard chessboard so that no two queens could attack each other.

This means putting one queen in each row, so that no two queens are in the same column, and no two queens in the same diagonal (see below).

There is more than one potential solution.

The reason such problems are so difficult for computer programmes is that there are so many options to consider that it can take many years due to a process of backtracking an algorithm used in programming where every possible option is considered and then backed away from until the correct solution is found.

Chess has long provided the source for puzzles such as the traditional fable of the servant who, when asked to choose a reward by his king, asked for one grain of rice to be placed on the first square of a standard 88 chessboard, doubled in the next and so on until it was found there was not enough rice in the entire world.

The fable indicates the huge numbers involved when using just a standard sized chess board. When the board size increases the numbers become vast.

See the article here:
Challenge to end stalemate over $1 million maths puzzle – The Courier

‘Simple’ chess puzzle holds key to $1m prize – Phys.Org

Credit: University of St Andrews

Researchers at the University of St Andrews have thrown down the gauntlet to computer programmers to find a solution to a “simple” chess puzzle which could, in fact, take thousands of years to solve and net a $1m prize.

Computer Scientist Professor Ian Gent and his colleagues, at the University of St Andrews, believe any program capable of solving the famous “Queens Puzzle” efficiently, would be so powerful, it would be capable of solving tasks currently considered impossible, such as decrypting the toughest security on the internet.

In a paper published in the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research today, the team conclude the rewards to be reaped by such a program would be immense, not least in financial terms with firms rushing to use it to offer technological solutions, and also a $1m prize offered by the Clay Mathematics Institute in America.

Devised in 1850, the Queens Puzzle originally challenged a player to place eight queens on a standard chessboard so that no two queens could attack each other. This means putting one queen in each row, so that no two queens are in the same column, and no two queens in the same diagonal. Although the problem has been solved by human beings, once the chess board increases to a large size no computer program can solve it.

Professor Gent and his colleagues, Senior Research Fellow Dr Peter Nightingale and Reader Dr Christopher Jefferson, all of the School of Computer Science at the University, first became intrigued by the puzzle after a friend challenged Professor Gent to solve it on Facebook.

The team found that once the chess board reached 1000 squares by 1000, computer progams could no longer cope with the vast number of options and sunk into a potentially eternal struggle akin to the fictional “super computer” Deep Thought in Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which took seven and a half million years to provide an answer to the meaning of everything.

Professsor Gent said: “If you could write a computer program that could solve the problem really fast, you could adapt it to solve many of the most important problems that affect us all daily.

“This includes trivial challenges like working out the largest group of your Facebook friends who don’t know each other, or very important ones like cracking the codes that keep all our online transactions safe.”

The reason these problems are so difficult for computer programs, is that there are so many options to consider that it can take many years. This is due to a process of “backtracking” an algorithm used in programming where every possible option is considered and then “backed away” from until the correct solution is found.

Dr Nightingale said: “However, this is all theoretical. In practice, nobody has ever come close to writing a program that can solve the problem quickly. So what our research has shown is that for all practical purposes it can’t be done.”

Dr Jefferson added: “There is a $1,000,000 prize for anyone who can prove whether or not the Queens Puzzle can be solved quickly so the rewards are high.”

Chess has long provided the source for puzzles such as the traditional fable of the servant who, when asked to choose a reward by his king, asked for one grain of rice to be placed on the first square of a standard 8×8 chessboard, doubled in the next and so on until it was found there was not enough rice in the entire world.

The fable indicates the huge numbers involved when using just a standard sized chess board. When the board size increases the numbers become vast.

Explore further: Institute offers public chess challenge to learn more about how we think (Update)

More information: Complexity of n-Queens Completion. Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research. DOI:DOI: 10.1613/jair.5512 , http://jair.org/papers/paper5512.html

See more here:
‘Simple’ chess puzzle holds key to $1m prize – Phys.Org

The Puzzles of Marcel Duchamp – Foyles

Connecting the Dots – The Puzzles of Marcel Duchamp

Augustus Rose is a novelist and screenwriter. He was born in the northern Californian coastal town of Bolinas, and grew up there and in San Francisco. He lives in Chicago with his wife, the novelist Nami Mun, and their son, and teaches fiction writing at the University of Chicago. His new complex and multi-layered novel, The Readymade Thief, is part literary detective novel, part art history, part conspiracy thriller. Seventeen-year- old Lee Cuddy, on the run in Philadelphia, is inadvertently plunged into a twisted world where a secret society of fanatical Marcel Duchamp fans are intent on cracking what they believe to be the cosmos-altering code of the French artists oeuvre. Below, exclusively for Foyles, Augustus explains how he first came across the work of Marcel Duchamp and the influence the artist has had on him and his new novel.

Marcel Duchamps The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (aka The Large Glass) is a towering work, comprising two large panels of glass framed in steel and standing over 2.7 meters tall. Arranged between the glass panes is a menagerie of forms some abstract, some mechanical, one vaguely insectoid that represent a narrative of frustrated desire caught in a moment of time. Duchamp worked on it for eight years until 1923, when he reportedly grew bored and simply declared it ‘definitively unfinished’. And yet, after it was shattered in transit in 1926, Duchamp spent a full year piecing it back together, shard by shard, like some cruel jigsaw puzzle. The story goes that when hed laid the final piece in, pleased with the lattice of cracks that now ran through the whole work, he was satisfied it was finished at last.

I was 18 when I first saw a photo of The Large Glass. I was working in a bookstore at the time, sorting through boxes of used books to shelve when I came across a volume on Duchamp and began flipping through it. The photo shows a man gazing up through the glass, his expression at once mesmerised and perplexed. I cant remember what struck me about it so many years ago perhaps something about its transparency, or some intuition of the unrequited love narrative but Ive been fixated on Duchamp, as both artist and man, ever since.

In 1969 another of Duchamps works, tant donns what Jasper Johns once called the ‘strangest work of art in any museum’ was permanently installed in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in a small alcove near The Large Glass. Duchamp, who had died the year before, had been constructing the work in almost total secrecy for two decades, having convinced the world hed abandoned art to play chess. tant donns is a 3-D tableau, to be viewed through a small peephole in an antique door, and forms a kind of corollary to The Large Glass. In it a nude woman lies supine on a bed or dry reeds, and holds aloft an antique gas lantern. She is commonly seen as The Bride from the former work, perhaps post-coital. The ‘illuminating gas’ of the lantern is another connective thread between the two (the gas being a component of The Large Glass as well).

As I revisited his work in anticipation of what would eventually become my Duchamp-centered novel The Readymade Thief, I began to notice how much of his work was interconnected, self-referential and often carrying over various themes and motifs. If looked at in the right way (‘from the other side of the glass with one eye, close to, for almost an hour’ to riff on the title of one of his works), his oeuvre can be seen as a kind of system, each work a part of a greater whole.

For example, in 1916 Duchamp made With Hidden Noise, one of his ‘assisted readymades’, which comprises two square brass plates held together by four long screws, sandwiching between them a ball of nautical twine. Written on the top and bottom of the work is a seemingly nonsensical cryptogram. Before assembling it Duchamp gave the pieces to his friend and patron Walter Arensberg and told him to put something inside the twine before screwing it together. Duchamp never knew what it was and he swore Arensberg to secrecy, so to this day no one knows what rattles inside when the object is shaken. In the novel, when my young protagonist Lee Cuddy picks it up, she thinks of it as ‘nothing more than a whimsical curio she might have picked up from a table and held with only momentary intrigue’.

But the ball of thread in With Hidden Noise references another Duchamp work from three years earlier, Three Standard Stoppages, for which he dropped three threads of equal length onto sheets of paper, then traced their outlines to create rulers for new units of measurement. These same lines later became the network of ‘capillary tubes’ that carry the illuminating gas in The Large Glass. Thread appears in other Duchampian endeavours as well, such as in his contribution to the 1942 First Papers of Surrealism exhibition, for which he strung several hundred yards of twine in an elaborate web throughout the exhibition space.

Duchamps intent behind this kind of interconnectivity remains unclear (he was notoriously obscure on issues of intent) but for me, the writer of a conspiratorially-minded novel, it proved to be a goldmine. For yearsId circled for ways to write a novel around him, yet it all proved elusive until I hit upon a kind of ‘What if?’ question: What if Duchamp had left behind a final undiscovered work, housed in a hidden room beneath the Philadelphia Museum of Art? And what if his entire oeuvre was in fact a series of cryptic keys that, if solved, could unlock a secret encrypted within that final work? Connecting the (unintended) dots became a game I played along with the Socit Anonyme, the group of nine Duchamp-obsessed men in the novel who are trying to solve this same puzzle. Once the stars became clear it just became a matter of imagining the constellations within.

I even found a tidy solution to the cryptogram on With Hidden Noise (an artwork that a California art professor found 350.000 words to write about), using another of Duchamps works as a key. Im guessing its not a solution Duchamp ever intended, but as Duchamp himself once said: ‘There is no solution because there is no problem.’ I hope Duchamp would have approved of my taking it upon myself to invent both.

Read more here:
The Puzzles of Marcel Duchamp – Foyles

Did you solve it? Riddles inspired by card tricks – The Guardian

On my puzzle blog earlier today I set the following three riddles, here reprinted with the answers.

The ideas all come from card tricks. In the comments section you might want to suggest the best way to perform card tricks that are based on these mathematical patterns.

Chess Boxing

A hustler and a chess grandmaster are playing the following game. All the pieces from a chess set are in a box. The two participants take turns reaching into the box without looking, picking out two pieces at a time and placing them onto the table. If the two pieces are white, the grandmaster gets a point. If the two pieces are black, the hustler gets a point. If the colours dont match, no one gets a point. They will take turns removing pairs until the box is empty. If, exactly halfway through the game, the score is 4-2 in favour of the grandmaster, who will ultimately win the game and by how many points?

Solution

The game will always be a draw. The number of black and white pieces is the same, so if two white pieces are taken from the box, the box will have two more black pieces than white ones, so there must be a turn later in the game in which two black pieces are taken, levelling out the scores. If the score is 4-2, at least 8 white have been taken and 4 black, meaning that the box has 4 more black in it than white, since when one of each colour is taken the colour surplus does not change. If the box has 4 more black pieces than white pieces, this guarantees two points for the hustler, meaning the final score will be 4-4, or a higher scoring draw.

Tunnel Traffic

A boulder falls onto a mountain road, temporarily blocking access to a tunnel. A few drivers get out of their cars to help move the boulder. After they successfully clear the entrance to the tunnel, they notice some unusual traffic has accumulated on the two-lane road behind them. The traffic jam consists of eighteen white cars and eighteen black cars. The first car in the left lane is white and the first car in the right lane is black. The colours of the cars behind them in each lane alternate perfectly.

When passing through the narrow tunnel, the two lanes of traffic merge into one, and when they come out the other side the single lane branches to two toll booths. Assuming that the first car through the tunnel is a black car and the last car through is a white car, and that the cars reach the toll booth in pairs meaning that the first two cars exit together, then the next two exit together, and so on what is the greatest possible number of exiting pairs that will match in colour?

Solution:

None.

Imagine one lane is BWBWBW… and the other is WBWBWB… If the first car through the tunnel is a B, then car behind is either the second car in the first lane or the first car in the second lane, which is always a W. These two cars will exit together and do not match in colour.

The third car through the tunnel is either a W or a B. If it was a W, then this means that two lanes of remaining cars BOTH have a B at the front. (Sketch the order of the lanes down and cross them out as they go through the tunnel and you will see the pattern emerge). And if both have a B in the front, the fourth car must be a B. So, again, when the third and fourth cars exit together they will not match in colour. If the third car is a B, then the two lanes of cars must both have a W at the front, and so on…

The process of the two lines of traffic merging into one is the same as merging two sets of cards into one. The order of the cards within each set do not change relative to each other, and this produces the nice effect that when you count them out in twos from one end of the pack, you always get one of each colour.

Family Bike Race

At the Froome family reunion, five sets of twins from five different generations decide to have a bike race, with two teams and one sibling from each set of twins on each team. Each team sets off with all five cyclists in a line behind their captain. At any point in the race, the last person in the line can cycle to the front of the line to become the new captain. All five team members must cross the finish line to complete the race.

Both teams line up in age order but Team A starts the race with a little kid as their captain and Team B starts the race with an elderly woman as their captain. During the course of the race, the captains change six times between the two teams. When the teams cross the finish line, what are the odds that their captains will be the same age?

Solution

100 per cent. Lets call the five sets of twins in age ascending order 1A and 1B, 2A and 2B, 3A and 3B, 4A and 4B and 5A and 5B.

So, Team A starts in this order 1A 2A 3A 4A 5A

Team B starts 5B 4B 3B 2B 1B

The last person replaces the first person six times. So either one team does it six times and the other zero, or five times and one time, or four and two, or three and three. You will see that in each case, the leaders of the teams are the same set of twins.

For example, lets say Team A replaces its leader once. The order will then be 5A 1A 2A 3A 4A. And lets say Team B replaces its leader five times. Which puts them back to the starting formation 5B 4B 3B 2B 1B. Twins 5A and 5B – who have the same age! – are the finishing captains for their teams.

I hope you enjoyed these puzzles. Thanks again to Adam Rubin from the magical website Art of Play.

My latest book is out this week! Football School Season 2 is the follow-up to Football School, a book series aimed at 7-12-year-olds which TalkSPORT called a Horrible Histories for football. The new book explains why every stadium has a vomitory, the physics of why footballs are NOT round and which international goalkeeper used to pee on the pitch before penalty shoot-outs. As well as lots of maths, English, history, geography and more. The perfect gift for a football-mad boy or girl! More info at footballschool.co.

I set a puzzle here every two weeks on a Monday. Send me your email if you want me to alert you each time I post a new one. Im always on the look-out for great puzzles. If you would like to suggest one, email me.

Read the original:
Did you solve it? Riddles inspired by card tricks – The Guardian

Capcom’s ‘Puzzle Fighter’ Brings the Classic Game to Mobile – Touch Arcade

Capcom announced today that it’s planning on bringing Puzzle Fighter, the sequel to the classic Super Puzzle Fighter 2 Turbo (and its HD Remix remake), to iOS and Android before the end of the year, so if you enjoy puzzle games with your favorite Capcom characters, you’re in luck. The game will get a new look and new features, and will include characters such as Ryu, Ken, and Chun-Li from Street Fighter, X from Mega Man, Morrigan from Darkstalkers, Frank West from Dead Rising, and more. In terms of features, the game will have real-time PvP battles, single player content, and more. Puzzle Fighter will of course be a free to play title, so you should know by now what to expect in terms of monetization.

For those who’ve never played the original games, Puzzle Fighter has you picking a character and two “assist” characters and matching gems as you try to take out your opponent. The assist characters can enhance the main character’s abilities, so there’s plenty of strategy in which characters to pick and how to go about building up combos. And you get to do your matching is some very iconic arenas from Capcom games. The game should be soft launching pretty soon, and theworldwide release should come before the end of 2017.

View original post here:
Capcom’s ‘Puzzle Fighter’ Brings the Classic Game to Mobile – Touch Arcade


Page 4«..3456..1020..»